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Review MIDI keyboard Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII. Where to buy it?

Arturia is a company based in Grenoble, France, specializing in the development of music software and hardware, with products aimed at both amateurs and professionals. I’ll tell you how this post is built. First, I’m going to list the features of this Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII keyboard. Then you have a video or two, purchase links and useful comments from other users and then you have one of the most useful parts; comparison tables with similar keyboards so you can compare.

  • With 88 keys and CV connections
  • Fatar plywood keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR)
  • Speed sensitive and Aftertouch
  • 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function
  • 9 faders
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • LCD screen
  • Transport section
  • Tone and modulation wheels
  • MIDI Input/Output
  • Input for a sustain pedal and 6.3 mm jack expression
  • 3 assignable pedal inputs 6.3 mm jack
  • 3.5 mm mini-jack CV input
  • Tone and door output 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • Output Mod 1 and Mod 2 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • USB connection
  • Input for 9 — 12 V DC power supply 1.0 A
  • Aluminum housing with wooden side panels
  • Includes magnetic templates for Ableton Live, Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Cubase, Studio One, Reaper and Mackie/HUI configurations
  • Score/iPad support
  • Removable laptop shelf
  • The software package contains: Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V
  • Dimensions: 1293 x 322 x 112 mm
  • Weight: 15 kg

review arturia-keylab-88-mkii
This high-quality MIDI keyboard is usually priced at around €875/£789/$866 and offers a Fatar plywood keyboard with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR) with 88 speed-sensitive keys and aftertouch function. This means that they have real pressure sensitivity, giving greater realism than those without this function.

As other control functions we have: 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), a central knob to choose different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend.

In connections we find that the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII integrates CV outputs (pitch out, gate out, Mod 1 and Mod 2), MIDI input and output, inputs for expression pedals, sustain and 3 auxiliaries, CV input, external power supply input and USB connection.

Includes Analog Lab 4 software license with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V.

Now that we have seen the features of this Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII keyboard watch these related videos to learn more.

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Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII vs Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 K12

The Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII MIDI Keyboard is priced at €875/£789/$866 while the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2 is priced at €945/£866/$955. Let’s move on to the face-to-face:

  • Both offer a Fatar keyboard with 88 weighted keys, with hammer action and aftertouch.
  • The Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII offers 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), a central knob to choose different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend. When the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2 offers 1 4D push encoder, 8 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), modulation wheels and pitch bend.
  • In connection, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII integrates CV outputs (pitch out, gate out, Mod 1 and Mod 2), MIDI input and output, inputs for expression pedals, sustain and 3 auxiliaries, CV input, external power supply input and USB connection. And the Native Instruments Kompletete Kontrol S88 MK2 has integrated MIDI input and output, two pedal inputs, input for external power supply and USB connection.
  • The Arturia includes the Analog Lab 4 software license with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V. And the Native Instruments includes the KOMPLETE SELECT license.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII

Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2

  • With 88 keys and CV connections
  • Fatar plywood keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR)
  • Speed sensitive and Aftertouch
  • 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function
  • 9 faders
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • LCD screen
  • Transport section
  • Tone and modulation wheels
  • MIDI Input/Output
  • Input for a sustain pedal and 6.3 mm jack expression
  • 3 assignable pedal inputs 6.3 mm jack
  • 3.5 mm mini-jack CV input
  • Tone and door output 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • Output Mod 1 and Mod 2 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • USB connection
  • Input for 9 — 12 V DC power supply 1.0 A
  • Aluminum housing with wooden side panels
  • Includes magnetic templates for Ableton Live, Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Cubase, Studio One, Reaper and Mackie/HUI configurations
  • Score/iPad support
  • Removable laptop shelf
  • The software package contains: Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V
  • Dimensions: 1293 x 322 x 112 mm
  • Weight: 15 kg
  • For NI Komplete
  • Fatar keyboard with 88 hammer-action weighted keys
  • Pitch and modulation wheels, plus touch strip for expression control
  • Pre-mapped control for KOMPLETE instruments and hundreds of Native Kontrol Standard (NKS) instruments from leading manufacturers
  • Full VSTi support
  • Tag-based preset navigation: Find sounds quickly and hear previews instantly
  • Two high-resolution color screens
  • Push-button 4D encoder
  • Light guide: RGB lights above each key highlight percussion cells, key switches, chords, scales and more
  • Smart Play: Check the Light Guide scales and modes
  • Seamless integration with MASCHINE software/hardware
  • Intuitive control over Logic Pro X, Ableton Live, GarageBand, Cubase and Nuendo
  • Includes KOMPLETE SELECT
  • Two assignable pedal inputs
  • MIDI In/Out
  • Dimensions: 1390 x 346 x 115 mm
  • Weight: 13.2 kg

In our first comparison, we have two high-quality MIDI controllers, on the one hand, we have the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII which offers 88 weighted, sensitive and aftertouch keys, 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), a central knob to choose different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend. And on the other hand, we have the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2 which also offers 88 weighted keys, with sensitivity and aftertouch, 1 4D push encoder, 8 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), modulation wheels and pitch bend.

Finding so many similarities between them will be somewhat complicated to decide which is the best option, but in the advantages of the Arturia, we can count on its CV connections and faders that do not have their competition. Then we could indicate that it is the best option, although if you do not need them, the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2 is also an excellent choice.

And here is a video of the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2 keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S88 MK2 review.

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII vs Studiologic SL88 Grand

The Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII MIDI Keyboard is priced at €875/£789/$866 when the Studiologic SL88 Grand is priced at €769/£699/$785. This is the face-to-face one:

  • Both offer an 88-key counterbalanced keyboard, with hammer and aftertouch action. The Arturia’s keyboard is Fatar and the Studiologic’s is a TP40Wood with wooden core keys and ivory touch.
  • The Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII features 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), a center knob for choosing different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend. When the Studiologic SL88 Grand offers 1 innovative 6-position control joystick (4-way switch + 1 rotary encoder + ‘push’ button), 3 function buttons and 3 programmable joystick controllers
  • In connections, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII integrates CV outputs (pitch out, gate out, Mod 1 and Mod 2), MIDI input and output, inputs for expression pedals, sustain and 3 auxiliaries, CV input, external power supply input and USB connection. And the Studiologic SL88 Grand integrates MIDI input and two outputs, four inputs for pedals, input for external power supply and USB connection.
  • The Arturia includes the Analog Lab 4 software licenses with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V. And the Studiologic includes the SL Editor license.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII

Studiologic SL88 Grand

  • With 88 keys and CV connections
  • Fatar plywood keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR)
  • Speed sensitive and Aftertouch
  • 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function
  • 9 faders
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • LCD screen
  • Transport section
  • Tone and modulation wheels
  • MIDI Input/Output
  • Input for a sustain pedal and 6.3 mm jack expression
  • 3 assignable pedal inputs 6.3 mm jack
  • 3.5 mm mini-jack CV input
  • Tone and door output 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • Output Mod 1 and Mod 2 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • USB connection
  • Input for 9 — 12 V DC power supply 1.0 A
  • Aluminum housing with wooden side panels
  • Includes magnetic templates for Ableton Live, Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Cubase, Studio One, Reaper and Mackie/HUI configurations
  • Score/iPad support
  • Removable laptop shelf
  • The software package contains: Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V
  • Dimensions: 1293 x 322 x 112 mm
  • Weight: 15 kg
  • 88-key keyboard with hammer mechanism TP40Wood with Aftertouch
  • Wood-core keys with Ivory Touch surface
  • New 6-way control joystick
  • 3 function buttons
  • 4 programmable zones
  • 4 programmable pedal connections
  • 3 programmable joystick controllers
  • 320 x 240 px TFT colour graphic display
  • Editable and programmable software
  • New user-programmable key balance function
  • 6 editable speed curves
  • Magnetic rail system to adapt a lectern or laptop holder (lectern and holder not included)
  • Dimensions (L x W x H): 1260 x 310 x 110 mm
  • Weight: 20.8 kg
  • Includes 9V DC 1A power supply, VFP1/10 sustain pedal and virtual instrument collection (after registration of the hardware)

In this comparison we again find two high-quality MIDI controllers, on the one hand, we have the already analyzed Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII, on the other hand, we have the Studiologic SL88 Grand which offers an 88-key keyboard with TP40Wood hammer mechanism with Aftertouch, the keys have a wooden core and ivory touch, 1 innovative 6-position control joystick (4-way switch + 1 rotary encoder + ‘push’ button), 3 function buttons and 3 programmable joystick controllers.

Again we found a difficult decision due to the great similarity between both MIDI controllers, both have a great Fatar brand keyboard, as the main advantage the Studiologic SL88 Grand is that the keyboard has wooden keys increasing the simulation of a real acoustic piano, for a pianist, this will be very appreciated.

And here is a video of the Studiologic SL88 Grand keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Studiologic SL88 Grand review.

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII vs Roland A-88 MKII

The Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII MIDI Keyboard is priced at €875/£789/$866 and the Roland A-88 MKII is priced at €959/£859/$949. Let’s move on to the face-to-face:

  • Both offer an 88-key counterbalanced keyboard, with hammer action. The Arturia’s keyboard is Fatar with the Aftertouch function and the Roland’s is a PH4-Standard with an ivory touch.
  • The Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII features 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), a center knob for choosing different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend. When the Roland A-88 MKII offers 8 pads and 8 knobs both assignable, octave up/down keys and modulation and pitch bend joystick.
  • In connections, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII integrates CV outputs (pitch out, gate out, Mod 1 and Mod 2), MIDI input and output, inputs for expression pedals, sustain and 3 auxiliary, CV input, external power supply input and USB connection. And the Roland A-88 MKII integrates USB connection, MIDI input and output and power supply input, plus damper pedal input, FC1 and FC2.
  • The Arturia includes the software licenses Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII

Roland A-88 MKII

  • With 88 keys and CV connections
  • Fatar plywood keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR)
  • Speed sensitive and Aftertouch
  • 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function
  • 9 faders
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • LCD screen
  • Transport section
  • Tone and modulation wheels
  • MIDI Input/Output
  • Input for a sustain pedal and 6.3 mm jack expression
  • 3 assignable pedal inputs 6.3 mm jack
  • 3.5 mm mini-jack CV input
  • Tone and door output 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • Output Mod 1 and Mod 2 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • USB connection
  • Input for 9 — 12 V DC power supply 1.0 A
  • Aluminum housing with wooden side panels
  • Includes magnetic templates for Ableton Live, Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Cubase, Studio One, Reaper and Mackie/HUI configurations
  • Score/iPad support
  • Removable laptop shelf
  • The software package contains: Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V
  • Dimensions: 1293 x 322 x 112 mm
  • Weight: 15 kg
  • 88-key weighted keyboard with Ivory Feel (PHA-4 Standard)
  • Three definable keyboard zones
  • Joystick for Pitch/Modulation function
  • +/- buttons for octave selection and keyboard sensitivity adjustment
  • Arpeggiator and chord storage
  • 8 Pads and rotary controllers with RGB lighting for controlling MIDI hardware and software (16 freely programmable banks)
  • Standard MIDI 2.0 support
  • Robust housing with wooden elements and high-quality materials
  • USB-C port
  • MIDI input and output
  • Connection for 6.3 mm Sustain Jack pedal
  • 2 connections for expression pedal 6.3 mm jack
  • Powered by USB-C port or external transformer (PSB-1U, not included)
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): 1429 x 274 x 119 mm
  • Weight: 16.3 kg

Again we have two great MIDI controllers, on the one hand, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII that we have already analyzed before, and on the other hand the Roland A-88 MKII that offers 88 weighted keys with Ivory Feel (PHA-4 Standard), 8 pads and 8 knobs both assignable, octave up/down keys and modulation and pitch bend joystick.

We find certain advantages in each, on the side of the Arturia the greater number of pads and their faders that are very useful in themes such as mixing. And on the Roland side its wooden casing making it stronger and more durable, as well as having a better design. Depending on which one best meets your needs you will make the best decision.

And here is a video of the Roland A-88 MKII keyboard

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII vs Arturia KeyLab Essential 61

The Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII MIDI Keyboard is priced at €875/£789/$866 while the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 is priced at €239/£215/$239 with a large difference of 638 Euro between them. Let’s move on to the face-to-face:

  • The Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII offers a plywood Fatar keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR) with 88 speed-sensitive keys and aftertouch function and the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 offers 61 speed-sensitive keys.
  • The Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII offers 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc.), a central knob for choosing different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend. When the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 offers 1 pushable encoder, 8 sensitive pads, 9 assignable knobs, transport keys, octaves up/down, and pitch bend and modulation wheels.
  • In connections, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII integrates CV outputs (pitch out, gate out, Mod 1 and Mod 2), MIDI input and output, expression pedal inputs, sustain and 3 auxiliary inputs, CV input, external power supply input and USB connection. The Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 has an integrated USB connection, sustain pedal input, external power supply input and MIDI output.
  • The Arturia includes the Arturia Analog Lab 4 software licenses with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V. And the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 includes Arturia Analog Lab 2 software, Ableton Live Lite and UVI Grand Piano.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII

Arturia KeyLab Essential 61

  • With 88 keys and CV connections
  • Fatar plywood keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR)
  • Speed sensitive and Aftertouch
  • 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function
  • 9 faders
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • LCD screen
  • Transport section
  • Tone and modulation wheels
  • MIDI Input/Output
  • Input for a sustain pedal and 6.3 mm jack expression
  • 3 assignable pedal inputs 6.3 mm jack
  • 3.5 mm mini-jack CV input
  • Tone and door output 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • Output Mod 1 and Mod 2 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • USB connection
  • Input for 9 — 12 V DC power supply 1.0 A
  • Aluminum housing with wooden side panels
  • Includes magnetic templates for Ableton Live, Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Cubase, Studio One, Reaper and Mackie/HUI configurations
  • Score/iPad support
  • Removable laptop shelf
  • The software package contains: Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V
  • Dimensions: 1293 x 322 x 112 mm
  • Weight: 15 kg

 

  • With 61 speed-sensitive keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive pads with Aftertouch
  • 1 pulse able encoder
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • 13 buttons
  • Transport section with 4 function switches
  • LCD screen
  • Tone and modulation wheel
  • Mode of interpretation of chords
  • Compatible with Mackie/HUI protocol
  • USB port
  • MIDI output
  • Connection for sustain pedal
  • Input for power supply (not included)
  • Native USB support
  • Includes Arturia Analog Lab 2, Ableton Live Lite and UVI Grand Piano software
  • Dimensions: 882 x 76 x 248mm (width x height x depth)
  • Weight: 3,3Kg
  • Attention: Internet connection required to authorize the product

In this comparison we have two MIDI controllers of the same brand, Arturia, on the one hand, the already analyzed Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII and on the other hand the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 which offers 61 sensitive keys, 1 clickable encoder, 8 sensitive pads, 9 assignable knobs, transport keys, octaves up/down, and pitch bend and modulation wheels.

As we can see the Arturia KeyLab 88MKII is the big brother offering more and better functions, however also its price difference is very big. If you want a high-quality MIDI controller, design, connections and functions, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII will be your decision, on the other hand, if you need a keyboard with moderate functions and a 61-key keyboard without aftertouch or counterbalance the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 will be your decision.

And here is a video of the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Arturia KeyLab Essential 61 review.

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII vs M-Audio Hammer 88

The Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII MIDI keyboard is priced at €875/£789/$866 while the M-Audio Hammer 88 is priced at €422/£366/$419, with a notable difference. Let’s go head to head:

  • Both offer a Fatar keyboard with 88 weighted keys, with hammer action. The Arturia’s keyboard is a Fatar TP100-LR with aftertouch.
  • The Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII features 16 illuminated pads with chord memory function, 9 assignable faders, 9 assignable knobs, transport buttons (rec, play, pause, stop, etc), a center knob for choosing different functions, modulation wheels and pitch bend. When the M-Audio Hammer 88 offers 1 volume fader, octave up/down keys, and modulation and pitch bend wheels.
  • When connected, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII features CV outputs (pitch out, gate out, Mod 1 and Mod 2), MIDI input and output, inputs for expression pedals, sustain and 3 auxiliary inputs, CV input, external power supply input, and USB connection. And the M-Audio Hammer 88 features an integrated USB connection, MIDI output, power supply input, and MIDI output.
  • The Arturia includes the Analog Lab 4 software license with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V. The M-Audio Hammer 88 includes the AIR “Mini Grand” Acoustic Grand Piano, AIR “Velvet” Vintage Electric Piano, AIR “DB-33” Tonewheel Organ Simulator and SONiVOX “Eighty-Eight Ensemble” Authentic Piano Instrument and Ableton Live Lite.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII

M-Audio Hammer 88

  • With 88 keys and CV connections
  • Fatar plywood keyboard, with hammer action (Fatar — TP100LR)
  • Speed sensitive and Aftertouch
  • 16 lighted pads with chord memory function
  • 9 faders
  • 9 rotating knobs
  • LCD screen
  • Transport section
  • Tone and modulation wheels
  • MIDI Input/Output
  • Input for a sustain pedal and 6.3 mm jack expression
  • 3 assignable pedal inputs 6.3 mm jack
  • 3.5 mm mini-jack CV input
  • Tone and door output 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • Output Mod 1 and Mod 2 3.5 mm mini-jack
  • USB connection
  • Input for 9 — 12 V DC power supply 1.0 A
  • Aluminum housing with wooden side panels
  • Includes magnetic templates for Ableton Live, Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Cubase, Studio One, Reaper and Mackie/HUI configurations
  • Score/iPad support
  • Removable laptop shelf
  • The software package contains: Analog Lab 4 with 6000 synthesizer sounds, Ableton Live Lite, Arturia Wurli V, Arturia VOX Continental V and Arturia Piano V
  • Dimensions: 1293 x 322 x 112 mm
  • Weight: 15 kg
  • Supervisor with a keyboard with counterbalanced hammer mechanics
  • Eighty-eight keys
  • USB-MIDI connection, Plug compatible
  • MIDI output for connection to external MIDI peripherals
  • Pitch-Bend and modulation wheels
  • Volume Fader and Up/Down Buttons
  • Keyboard zone assignment for Split and Layer functions and 1-finger chord function (four voices)
  • Easy factor editing through the Hammer eighty-eight editor included
  • Compatible with iOS with Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit connector (free separately)
  • Includes software package licenses: AIR “Mini Grand” Acoustic Grand Piano, AIR “Velvet” Vintage Electric Piano, AIR “DB-thirty-three” Tonewheel Organ Simulator and SONiVOX “Eighty-Eight Ensemble” Authentic Piano Instrument
  • Ableton Live Lite
  • Includes three-month license for Skoove for online piano lessons
  • Includes score support
  • Nutrition via USB port or external power supply (not included)
  • Dimensions: 1420 x 300 x 330 mm
  • Weight: seventeen with five kg

Once again, we find a comparison of 88-key MIDI controllers. On the one hand, the Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII offers its revised functions and features, while the M-Audio Hammer 88 offers an 88-key hammer-action counterbalanced keyboard, plus 1 volume fader, octave up/down keys, and modulation and pitch bend wheels.

While the Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII offers more features (connections, controls) than its competition and therefore is a better choice as a MIDI controller, the price of the controller is doubled. On the other hand, the M-Audio Hammer 88 offers fewer control features and gives us a weighted 88-key keyboard for less. If you have the budget, go for the Arturia, otherwise, the M-Audio Hammer 88 is not a bad choice.

And here’s a video of the M-Audio Hammer 88 keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the M-Audio Hammer 88 review.

What is the best of these MIDI keyboards if I am a beginner on a budget?

While the answer to this question lies mostly in what specific need you have, for example, if you want to have a keyboard with the widest range of notes possible, or if you want to have as many control features as possible, or perhaps a mix between the two, that is without leaving behind the different connections and software licenses that most MIDI controllers offer, we will give an objective opinion according to our experience in music production and thus also with the price demanded by the controllers, a kind of value for money.

In this post, we generally have 88-key MIDI controllers and also a hammer action keyboard, and as a star product, we can say that the M-Audio Hammer 88 is an excellent choice for beginners. It also offers 1 volume fader, octave up/down keys and modulation and pitch bend wheels. It has three pedal inputs: sustain, expression and footswitch. Although it’s not that cheap, it’s worth every euro it costs.

Where to buy the keyboard Arturia KeyLab 88 MkII

Thomann

  • Free Shipping.
  • Full warranty. If you have any problems, they take care of everything.
  • 100% reliable payment.
  • A leader in trouble-free shipping.
  • Usually the Best price.
  • Best Reputation: They are the leading online store in Europe and have the best catalog and information.

Amazon

  • Free Shipping and the possibility of shipping in one day with Amazon Premium.
  • Full Guarantee but they are no experts in music equipment.
  • Sometimes a better price.
  • He’s got worse stock than Thomann.

Also, look at these models with a similar price and features:

Jaime Echagüe

Hi! I'm Jaime Echagüe, a musician and an authentic fan of musical instruments. With this blog I want to give general information about musical instruments in an easy, direct and honest way. I hope you enjoy my website and that you find it very useful.

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