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Review MIDI keyboard Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller. Where to buy it?

Alesis is a company founded in the United States in 1980 that designs and markets electronic musical instruments, digital audio processors, audio mixers, drum amplifiers, digital audio interface amplifiers, recording equipment, drum machines, professional audio, and electronic percussion products.

This Post goes like this. First I list the features of this Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller, then you have a video or two, shopping links, and useful comments from other users, and then you have one of the most useful parts; comparison charts with similar keyboards for you to compare.

  • 49 sensitive keys
  • Compatible with virtually any midi software or midi device
  • USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or computer and external MIDI hardware
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Octave Up/Down buttons
  • Fader attributable to program changes
  • Includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition
  • Size: 81,5 x 18,5 x 6 cm

review alesis-q49-keyboard-controller
This MIDI keyboard is usually priced at around €75/£63/$72 and has the features to control basically any DAW of your choice, as it is compatible with virtually any MIDI software.

It has 49 full-size sensitive keys, which are sure to let you play a lot of compositions thanks to its 4 octaves, and if you need to go to a higher or lower range, you can use the Octave Up/Down buttons.

It also has other controls such as pitch bend wheels and modulation to modify the pitch of the notes in real-time, that is, when they sound. And a program change fader, which can be very useful when mixing a song.

Finally, the Alesis Q49 comes with the Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition licenses.

Now that we have seen the features of this Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller watch these related videos to learn more.

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Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller vs Akai LPK 25

The Alesis Q49 MIDI Keyboard Controller is priced at €75/£63/$72, while the Akai LPK 25 is priced at €42/£37/$42, let’s see its face to face:

  • The Alesis gives us 49 keys with sensitivity, while the Akai gives us 25 mini keys with sensitivity.
  • Both mention that they are compatible with practically all audio software, highly valued if you work on different DAWs. Whether PC or Mac.
  • The Alesis offers pitch bend and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons and a fader for program changes. The Akai offers an arpeggiator, sustain button, octave up/down buttons, and a tap tempo. It also offers 4 programmable memory banks.
  • The Alesis has USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware. And the Akai has its USB port.
  • The Alesis includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition when the Akai is a Software for Mac and PC.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller

Akai LPK 25

  • 49 sensitive keys
  • Compatible with virtually any MIDI software or MIDI device
  • USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Octave Up/Down buttons
  • Assignable fader for program changes
  • Includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition
  • Size: 81,5 x 18,5 x 6 cm
  • Works with virtually all audio software
  • 25 mini-format speed-sensitive keys
  • Arpeggiator
  • Sustain button
  • Octave Up/Down and Tap Tempo buttons
  • Plug&Play USB socket on Mac and PC without drivers
  • Fits neatly into a laptop bag or backpack
  • 4 programmable memory banks
  • Editor Software for Mac and PC included
  • Powered by a USB port, no mains power cable required
  • Size: 9,65 x 34,04 x 2,79 cm
  • Weight: 0.635 kg

As we see in a comparison of different MIDI controllers, on one hand, we have the Alesis Q49, which has 49 full-size keys, pitch bend, and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons, and an assignable fader, so if looking to play keyboard/organ/piano compositions it will be your best choice. On the other hand, the Akai LPK 25 is a smaller controller that offers the same features (removing the fader) as the Alesis, only in a smaller and more portable format, which will not be as comfortable if played by an experienced keyboardist, but for beginners, it works very well,

And here is a video of the LPK 25 Akai keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Akai LPK 25 review.

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller vs Miditech Midistart Music 25

The Alesis Q49 MIDI Keyboard Controller is priced at €75/£63/$72 and the Miditech Midistart Music 25 is priced at €58/£51/$60, which depending on the shop may vary.

  • The Alesis gives 49 keys at normal size with sensitivity, while the Miditech gives 25 keys at normal size with sensitivity.
  • The Alesis mentions that it is compatible with practically all audio software, highly valued if you work on different DAWs. Whether PC or Mac.
  • The Alesis offers pitch bend and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons and a fader for program changes. The Miditech offers a joystick for pitch bend and modulation, sustain button, and octave up/down buttons.
  • The Alesis has USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware. And the Miditech has its own USB port and MIDI output.
  • The Alesis includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition when the Miditech includes the Magix Samplitude SE.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller

Miditech Midistart Music 25

  • 49 sensitive keys
  • Compatible with virtually any MIDI software or MIDI device
  • USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Octave Up/Down buttons
  • Assignable fader for program changes
  • Includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition
  • Size: 81,5 x 18,5 x 6 cm
  • 25 large keys with sensitivity
  • Joystick for Pitchbend and Modulation
  • Octave buttons +/-
  • MIDI output
  • USB port
  • Includes USB cable
  • Magix Samplitude SE
  • Size: 380 x 80 x 240 mm
  • Weight: 2.3 Kg

And here’s a video of the Miditech Midistart Music 25 keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Miditech Midistart Music 25 review.

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller vs M-Audio Keystation 88 MkII

The Alesis Q49 MIDI Keyboard Controller as mentioned above is priced at €75/£63/$72 while the M-Audio Keystation 88 MkII is priced at €205/£177/$203. Let’s go head to head:

  • The Alesis gives you 49 full-size keys with sensitivity, while the M-Audio gives you 88 full-size keys with sensitivity.
  • The Alesis mentions that it is compatible with virtually all audio software, which is highly valued if you work on different DAWs. Whether PC or Mac. M-Audio mentions that it has plug-and-play functionality with either PC or Mac.
  • The Alesis features pitch bend and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons, and a fader (sliding resistor) for program changes. The M-Audio offers controls for pitch bend and modulation, and octave up/down, not to mention the transport buttons.
  • The Alesis has USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware. And the M-Audio has its USB port and sustain and expression pedal input.
  • The Alesis includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition when the M-Audio includes Ableton Live Lite and the SONiVOX Eighty-Eight Ensemble plug-in, a virtual piano instrument that captures a 9-foot Steinway CD327 piano.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller

M-Audio Keystation 88 MkII

  • 49 sensitive keys
  • Compatible with virtually any MIDI software or MIDI device
  • USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Octave Up/Down buttons
  • Assignable fader for program changes
  • Includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition
  • Size: 81,5 x 18,5 x 6 cm
  • 88 speed-sensitive full-size keys
  • USB MIDI connection for playing virtual instruments, controlling recording software, and more
  • Transport and directional buttons to operate with DAWs and software
  • Pitch Bend, Modulation, and Octave Controls
  • USB powered
  • Supports Plug-and-Play connectivity with Mac and PC
  • Lightweight design
  • IOS support using the Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit (sold separately)
  • Includes Ableton Live Lite, a powerful software sequencer for music creation and live performance
  • Includes the SONiVOX Eighty-Eight Ensemble plug-in, a virtual piano instrument that captures a 9-foot Steinway CD327
  • USB port
  • 1 MIDI port
  • 6.3mm Expression Pedal Jack
  • Jack for 6.3mm sustain pedal
  • Operates via USB or optional power supply
  • Approximate dimensions: 1346 x 240 x 100mm
  • Weight: 7,30Kg approx.

And here’s a video of the M-Audio Keystation 88 MkII

 

If in the comparison the keyboard decreased by 2 octaves, it now increases to a total of 7 octaves (grand piano). As mentioned before the Alesis has 49 full-size and sensitive keys, and offers pitch bend and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons, and an assignable fader. M-Audio has 88 full-size keys with sensitivity, plus transport buttons, pitch bend, modulation, and octave controls. If you want to play any composition on the keyboard without using the up/down octaves, the M-Audio Keystation 88 MKII is your choice, but don’t expect weighted keys or something similar for the price of the controller.

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the M-Audio Keystation 88 MKII review.

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller vs M-Audio Oxygen 61 Mk4

The Alesis Q49 MIDI Keyboard Controller is priced at €75/£63/$72, while the M-Audio Oxygen 61 Mk4 is priced at €155/£133/$154, which is twice as much as the first one. We’ll take a look at the next one face-to-face, so you can see which one is the best choice for you:

  • The Alesis gives you 49 keys at normal size with sensitivity, while the M-Audio gives you 61 keys at normal size with synthesizer action and sensitivity.
  • Both mention that they are compatible with virtually all audio software, which is highly valued if you work in different DAWs. Whether PC or Mac. M-Audio says it’s plug-and-play with PC or Mac.
  • The Alesis features pitch bend and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons, and a fader (sliding resistor) for program changes. The M-Audio has pitch bend and modulation wheels, octave up/down buttons, transport buttons, and also 8 sensitive pads, 8 assignable knobs, and 9 assignable faders (very useful when mixing in a DAW)
  • The Alesis has USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware. And the M-Audio has its USB port and sustain pedal input.
  • The Alesis includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition when the M-Audio includes Ableton Live Lite and SONiVOX Twist Synth.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller

M-Audio Oxygen 61 Mk4

  • 49 sensitive keys
  • Compatible with virtually any MIDI software or MIDI device
  • USB/MIDI connections and traditional MIDI ports for Mac or PC and external MIDI hardware
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Octave Up/Down buttons
  • Assignable fader for program changes
  • Includes Ableton Live Lite and Alesis Edition
  • Size: 81,5 x 18,5 x 6 cm
  • 61 full-size speed-sensitive synthesizer action keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive trigger pads
  • 8 assignable knobs
  • 9 assignable faders
  • Transport buttons for DAW control
  • Automation for popular DAWs: Ableton Live, Pro Tools, Logic, Cubase, and more
  • LCD screen
  • USB powered
  • Plug-and-Play Support
  • MIDI-USB connectivity
  • Input for sustain pedal
  • Included software: Ableton Live Lite and SONiVOX Twist Synth
  • Dimensions: 977 x 243 x 94mm (width x depth x height)
  • Weight: 3.4kg

And here is a video from the M-Audio Oxygen 61 Mk4 keyboard

We have two good MIDI controllers, on one side the Alesis Q49, which with a 4-octave keyboard and its octave, pitch bend, and modulation controls, provide what you need to start working on a DAW. And with the M-Audio Oxygen 61 MK4, we go up a notch, having a 5-octave keyboard (61 keys), transport buttons, 8 sensitive pads, 8 assignable knobs and 9 assignable faders, giving us more control in the DAW we are working on. Budget permitting, the M-Audio Oxygen 61 MK4 is certainly worth the increase in price.

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the M-Audio Oxygen 61 MK4 review.

Which is the best of these MIDI keyboards if I am a beginner on a budget?

While the answer to this question lies mostly in what specific need you have, e.g. if you want to have a keyboard with the widest possible note range, or if you want to have as many control functions as possible, or perhaps a mix between the two, that is without leaving behind the different connections and software licenses offered by most MIDI controllers, we will give an objective opinion according to our experience in music production and thus also with the price demanded by the controllers, a kind of value for money.

The best MIDI controller we consider in this post, is the M-Audio Oxygen 61 MK4, although it is not the cheapest one you can find, because of its price we have a great set of control functions besides having 5 octaves of note range and we also consider its compatibility and automation of different DAWs in the market, a great controller for a fair price. If you have the opportunity don’t hesitate to buy it.

Where to buy the Alesis Q49 Keyboard Controller?

Amazon

  • Free Shipping and the possibility of shipping in one day with Amazon Premium.
  • Full Guarantee but they are no experts in music equipment.
  • Sometimes a better price.
  • He’s got worse stock than Thomann.

Thomann

  • Free Shipping.
  • Full warranty. If you have any problems, they take care of everything.
  • 100% reliable payment.
  • A leader in trouble-free shipping.
  • Usually the Best price.
  • Best Reputation: They are the leading online store in Europe and have the best catalog and information.

Also, look at these models with a similar price and features:

Jaime Echagüe

Hi! I'm Jaime Echagüe, a musician and an authentic fan of musical instruments. With this blog I want to give general information about musical instruments in an easy, direct and honest way. I hope you enjoy my website and that you find it very useful.

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