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Review MIDI keyboard Alesis V61. Where to buy it?

Alesis is a company founded in the United States in 1980 that designs and markets electronic musical instruments, digital audio processors, audio mixers, drum amplifiers, digital audio interface amplifiers, recording equipment, drum machines, professional audio and electronic percussion products.

I’ll tell you how this post is built. First I list the features of this Alesis V61 keyboard. Then you have a video or two, purchase links and useful comments from other users and then you have one of the most useful parts; comparison tables with similar keyboards so you can compare.

  • 61 full-size keys
  • Square front keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive backlit pads
  • 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons
  • Octave up and down buttons allow you to access the full keyboard range
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Visual information through illuminated knobs and buttons
  • USB-powered and USB MIDI connectivity for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download) and xpand!2 by Air Music Tech software (download)

review alesis-v61

This MIDI keyboard is usually priced at around €144/£122/$142 and has a 4-octave keyboard, reaching 61 full-size sensitive keys, which will serve to play compositions in this note range, and if we want to go to a higher or lower range we can make use of the up/down octave buttons.

Other controls are 8 backlit pads that also have sensitivity and will allow you to create percussion rhythms or make use of other samples in the DAW you are working on.

There are also pitch bend and modulation wheels, to change the pitch of a note in real-time, i.e. while it’s playing. In controls, we also have 4 knobs and 4 buttons assignable to some function inside the DAW to use or to control more precisely any parameter in a plugin.

Finally, we can mention that the Alesis V61 includes the software Ableton Live Lite (download) and the software xpand!2 by Air Music Tech (download) very appreciated mostly by beginners.

Now that we have seen the features of this Alesis V61 keyboard watch these related videos to learn more.

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Alesis V61 vs Alesis VI61

The Alesis V61 MIDI Keyboard is priced at €144/£122/$142 while the Alesis VI61 is priced at 249 euros, with a difference of 106 euros between them. Let’s go face to face:

  • Both offer 61 keys with sensitivity, but in the Alesis VI61 they are semi-heavy, having better quality and feel when playing the keyboard.
  • Both offer back-lighted velocity-sensitive pads (intensity in MIDI language), in the Alesis V61 they are 8, and in the Alesis VI61 they are 16.
  • We also have assignable knobs and buttons, in the case of the Alesis V61 it is 4 knobs and 4 buttons, and in the Alesis VI61 it is 48 buttons and 16 knobs.
  • Both offer pitch bend and modulation wheels that allow you to change the height of a note while playing.
  • Both share visual information through the illuminated knobs and buttons, while the Alesis V61 also features an LED display.
  • Both can be powered via USB (USB port) and the Alesis VI61 has a 5-pin MIDI output offering flexible MIDI connectivity.
  • Both include the Ableton Live Lite software license (download), Xpand! software, and the Alesis VI61 2 software (download).

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis V61

Alesis VI61

  • 61 full-size keys
  • Square front keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive backlit pads
  • 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons
  • Octave up and down buttons allow you to access the full keyboard range
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Visual information through illuminated knobs and buttons
  • USB-powered and USB MIDI connectivity for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download) and xpand!2 by Air Music Tech software (download)
  • 61 semi-balanced keys with full-size aftertouch with square front
  • 16 speed-sensitive trigger pads with RGB backlighting for rhythm production and a clip release
  • Interface with 48 buttons and 16 assignable knobs with your music software
  • Pitch and modulation wheels provide precise and creative control
  • Seamless visual information via LED display and illuminated buttons + knobs
  • USB MIDI port and 5-pin MIDI output offer flexible MIDI connectivity
  • USB powered
  • Plug-and-Play support for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download), Xpand! 2 software (download)

In the first comparison, we have two models of the brand Alesis, which are very similar, but at the same time, we notice that one is a superior model, because of a greater number of functions. The Alesis V61 would be the younger brother, and the Alesis VI61 would be the older brother. If you are interested in the best functions and have the budget go for the Alesis VI61, if not the same the Alesis V61 is a good controller for its price.

And here is a video of the Alesis VI61 keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Alesis VI61 review.

Alesis V61 vs M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3

The Alesis V61 MIDI Keyboard is priced at €144/£122/$142 when the M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3 is priced at £115, with a difference of £28. We’ll see you face to face:

  • Both offer 61 keys with sensitivity, the Alesis V61 has square fronts.
  • The Alesis V61 offers 8 sensitive backlit pads, 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons, octave up and down buttons, and pitch and modulation wheels.
  • The M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3 offers modulation and pitch bend wheels, 1-octave switch, transport buttons (play, pause, stop, rec, etc.) and an assignable fader.
  • Both can be powered via USB, and the M-Audio has an external power supply input, as well as a MIDI output and a sustain pedal input.
  • The Alesis VL61 includes the Ableton Live Lite software license (download), Xpand! 2 software (download), and the M-Audio Keystation 61 MK includes Pro Tools First M-Audio Edition, Ableton Live Lite, AIR Mini Grand, AIR Velvet, and AIR Xpand!2

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis V61

M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3

  • 61 full-size keys
  • Square front keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive backlit pads
  • 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons
  • Octave up and down buttons allow you to access the full keyboard range
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Visual information through illuminated knobs and buttons
  • USB-powered and USB MIDI connectivity for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download) and xpand!2 by Air Music Tech software (download)
  • 61 speed-sensitive keys
  • Pitch bend and modulation wheels
  • Octave switch
  • Transport buttons for DAW control
  • A fader
  • 6.3 mm jack input for optional sustain pedal (not included)
  • USB bus-powered
  • MIDI output
  • Plug&Play for Mac and PC
  • Input for external power supply (not included)
  • Includes Pro Tools First M-Audio Edition, Ableton Live Lite, AIR Mini Grand, AIR Velvet, and AIR Xpand!2
  • Dimensions: 995 x 189 x 68 mm
  • Weight: 4.1 kg

We found good MIDI controllers, on the one hand, the Alesis V61, which has a greater number of functions than its competitor, and on the other hand, the M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3, which as mentioned is a good controller with moderate functions and can be used with any DAW with which it is compatible. The best option, thanks to its greater functions and its small difference in price is the Alesis V61.

Here’s a video of the M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3 keyboard

f you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the M-Audio Keystation 61 MK3 review.

Alesis V61 vs Novation Launchkey 61 MK2

The Alesis V61 MIDI Keyboard is priced at €144/£122/$142 while the Novation Launchkey 61 MK2 is priced at €275/£249/$277. Let’s move on to the face-to-face:

  • Both offer 61 keys with sensitivity, the Alesis V61 has square fronts.
  • The Alesis V61 offers 8 sensitive backlit pads, 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons, octave up and down buttons and pitch and modulation wheels.
  • The Novation Launchkey 61 MK2 offers 16 backlit RGB and sensitive pads, 2 Launchpad control buttons, 8 assignable knobs, 9 faders, transport control (play, rec, stop, pause, etc), transpose buttons, pitch and modulation wheels, mode buttons and 8 Mute/Solo buttons.
  • Both can be powered via USB (USB port) and the Novation Launchkey 61 MK2 has a sustain pedal input.
  • The Alesis VL61 includes the Ableton Live Lite software licenses (download), Xpand! 2 software (download) and the Novation Launchkey 61 MK2 includes the Novation V-Station software, Bass Station, Loopmasters sample pack and Ableton Live Lite.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis V61

Novation Launchkey 61 MK2

  • 61 full-size keys
  • Square front keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive backlit pads
  • 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons
  • Octave up and down buttons allow you to access the full keyboard range
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Visual information through illuminated knobs and buttons
  • USB-powered and USB MIDI connectivity for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download) and xpand!2 by Air Music Tech software (download
  • 61 keys
  • 16 multicolor touch-sensitive launch pads with RGB LEDs
  • 2 Launchpad control buttons
  • 8 control potentiometers
  • 9 faders
  • LED display
  • Transport control
  • Transposition buttons
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Mode buttons
  • 8 Mute/Solo buttons
  • Connections: USB and sustain pedal
  • Includes Novation V-Station software, Bass Station, Loopmasters sample pack and Ableton Live Lite
  • Dimensions: 940 x 90 x 270mm
  • Weight: 3.5k

This comparison again includes two devices with very similar functions and features, the Alesis V61 that we have already analyzed and on the other hand the Novation Launchkey 61 MK2 that has a slight number of more functions.

And here’s a video of the Novation Launchkey 61 MK2

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Novation Launchkey 61 MK2 review.

Alesis V61 vs Nektar Impact LX61+

The Alesis V61 MIDI Keyboard is priced at €144/£122/$142 when the Nektar Impact LX61+ is priced at €148/£133/$148, but the difference is so small that this may vary depending on the shop d0 where we ask. Interesting comparison because of its very similar price.

  • Both offer 61 keys with sensitivity, those of the Alesis V61 have square fronts.
  • The Alesis V61 offers 8 sensitive backlit pads, 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons, octave up and down buttons and pitch and modulation wheels.
  • The Nektar Impact LX61+ offers 8 speed-sensitive pads with 4-colour LED illumination, 9 30mm faders, 8 rotary encoders, 9 assignable buttons, 6 transport buttons (rec, play, stop, pause, etc.), octave shift buttons, transposition switches and pitch bend and modulation wheels. In addition, an interesting extended transport control function, including click, go to locator and more, which will allow us to have more control of the audio clips.
  • Both can be powered via USB and the Nektar Impact LX61+ has a footswitch input.
  • The Alesis VL61 includes the Ableton Live Lite software licenses (download), Xpand software! 2 software (download) and the Nektar Impact LX61+ includes a Bitwig 8-Track software download.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis V61

Nektar Impact LX61+

  • 61 full-size keys
  • Square front keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive backlit pads
  • 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons
  • Octave up and down buttons allow you to access the full keyboard range
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Visual information through illuminated knobs and buttons
  • USB-powered and USB MIDI connectivity for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download) and xpand!2 by Air Music Tech software (download)
  • With 61 speed-sensitive keys
  • DAW integration including track volume and track selection, patch selection and more
  • Suitable for all popular DAWs, including Logic, Cubase, Studio One, Reason, Bitwig and more
  • 9 faders of 30mm
  • 8 rotary encoders
  • 9 assignable buttons
  • 6 transport buttons
  • Octave shift
  • Transposition switches
  • Pitch bend and modulation wheels
  • 4-speed curves plus 3 fixed speeds
  • 8 speed-sensitive pads with 4-color LED illumination providing 4 pad assignments and ‘learn’ pad function
  • Clip and scene switches for clip-based DAWs
  • Extended transport controls, including click, go to locator and more
  • 5 memory locations for user-defined parameter settings
  • Native USB support for real Plug ‘n Play
  • USB bus-powered
  • Connectors: Input for TS Footswitch jack 1/4″, USB
  • WIN 7 or higher, MAC OSX 10.7 or higher
  • Includes Bitwig 8-Track software download
  • Dimensions: 965 x 267 x 76mm approx.
  • Weight: 4,1kg

The interesting comparison we have now, with the Alesis V61 that we have already analyzed before, and the Nektar Impact LX61+ that for all its functions we can consider it a very complete and powerful MIDI controller, also with the DAW integration, its great compatibility and the advanced transport controls, that the competition does not offer, we can make clear that the Nektar Impact LX61 is the best option without any doubt.

And here’s a video of the Nektar Impact LX61+ keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Nektar Impact LX61+ review.

Alesis V61 vs Akai LPK 25

The Alesis V61 MIDI Keyboard is priced at €144/£122/$142 while the Akai LPK 25 is priced at €42/£37/$42. Let’s see the face-to-face:

  • The Alesis V61 offers 61 keys with sensitivity and square fronts, the Akai LPK 25 offers 25 mini keys with sensitivity.
  • The Alesis V61 offers 8 sensitive backlit pads, 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons, octave up and down buttons and pitch and modulation wheels.
  • The Akai LPK 25 offers an arpeggiator button, a sustain button and octave up/down buttons and a tap tempo button.
  • Both can be powered via USB.
  • The Alesis VL61 includes the Ableton Live Lite software license (download), Xpand! 2 software (download) and the Akai LPK 25 includes software for both Mac and PC.

Let’s put the features of these keyboards in a table so you can compare

Alesis V61

Akai LPK 25

  • 61 full-size keys
  • Square front keys
  • 8 speed-sensitive backlit pads
  • 4 assignable knobs and 4 assignable buttons
  • Octave up and down buttons allow you to access the full keyboard range
  • Pitch and modulation wheels
  • Visual information through illuminated knobs and buttons
  • USB-powered and USB MIDI connectivity for Mac and PC
  • Includes USB cable, Ableton Live Lite software (download) and xpand!2 by Air Music Tech software (download)
  • Works with virtually all audio software
  • 25 mini-format speed-sensitive keys
  • Arpeggiator
  • Sustain button
  • Octave Up/Down and Tap Tempo buttons
  • Plug&Play USB socket on Mac and PC without drivers
  • Fits neatly into a laptop bag or backpack
  • 4 programmable memory banks
  • Editor Software for Mac and PC included
  • Powered by USB port, no mains power cable required
  • Size: 9,65 x 34,04 x 2,79 cm
  • Weight: 0.635 kg

In our last comparison, we have a somewhat unfair face, the Alesis V61 with its moderate features and in front of it, the Akai LPK 25 which is a minimalist MIDI controller, where we only find the 25-key mini keyboard with sensitivity and certain buttons for specific functions. If you want to have total control over a DAW, the Alesis V61 will help you more, and if you want to have a keyboard to take anywhere and have compatibility with almost all audio software, the Akai LPK 25 will be your choice.

And here’s a video of the Akai LPK 25 keyboard

If you want to know more about this option, click on the following link to see the Akai LPK 25 review.

Which is the best of these MIDI keyboards if I am a beginner on a low budget?

While the answer to this question lies mostly in what specific need you have, for example, if you want to have a keyboard with the widest range of notes possible, or if you want to have as many control functions as possible, or perhaps a mix between the two, that is without leaving behind the different connections and software licenses that most MIDI controllers offer, we will give an objective opinion according to our experience in music production and thus also with the price that the controllers demand, a kind of value for money.

In this post we consider the Nektar Impact LX61+ to be one of the best value for money MIDI controllers ever mentioned. And this is thanks to its 5-octave keyboard, and its control functions that among others we can mention: pads, knobs, buttons, faders. In addition to its integration and compatibility with the most popular DAWs on the market, being sure to be very useful when buying the product.

Where to buy the Alesis V61 keyboard

Thomann

  • Free Shipping.
  • Full warranty. If you have any problems, they take care of everything.
  • 100% reliable payment.
  • A leader in trouble-free shipping.
  • Usually the Best price.
  • Best Reputation: They are the leading online store in Europe and have the best catalog and information.

Amazon

  • Free Shipping and the possibility of shipping in one day with Amazon Premium.
  • Full Guarantee but they are no experts in music equipment.
  • Sometimes a better price.
  • He’s got worse stock than Thomann.

Also, look at these models with a similar price and features:

Jaime Echagüe

Hi! I'm Jaime Echagüe, a musician and an authentic fan of musical instruments. With this blog I want to give general information about musical instruments in an easy, direct and honest way. I hope you enjoy my website and that you find it very useful.

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