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Digital Piano Kawai MP 11 Full Review. Is it a good choice?

Complete Review Kawai Digital Piano MP-11. Is it a good keyboard?

Kawai Musical Instruments Manufacturing Co. Ltd. is a Japanese company, founded by Koichi Kawai. And this time we will analyze the Kawai MP-11 SE digital piano, which according to Kawai is a “legacy product”. We will analyze both proposals in a comparison below, and it should be clarified that only the Kawai MP-11 SE is on the market with a price of €2135/£1,998:

  • 88 weighted keys (Weight that the keys of an acoustic piano have and that digital pianos try to imitate to equal the touch of the piano. The keys in the high register are heavier and in the high register less. This is different from the sensitivity on the keyboard which serves to regulate the volume of the note. But a counterbalanced keyboard always has sensitivity in the wooden keys that imitate the ivory touch very well. Keys with touch sensitivity very well achieved.
  • Grand Feel piano touch enhancement action with 3 sensors per key This is actually one of the best acoustic piano simulations ever made. Very successful (that’s why it’s worth it)
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds (various piano and other instrument sounds)
  • 40 sounds
  • Includes 208 configuration memories to further expand your possibilities
  • 256 notes of polyphony (Number of notes that can be played at once. This includes accompaniments that also consume notes. So if you play over an accompaniment more notes will be accumulated)
  • No speakers, but an amplifier simulator
  • DSP (Digital Signal Processing) effects. These are digital effects that modify the sound of the keyboard)
  • Recording in midi format (MIDI allows you to do such wonderful things as connect your keyboard to your computer, record a sound track and with certain programs pass with a click what you have played to musical notes on a score. MIDI tracks store the information of the musical notes), mp3/WAV.
  • It also has USB midi and conventional MIDI output
  • 128 x 64 pixel, self-lighted LCD display with good visibility
  • Metronome (Basic study element to study and practice the tempo of a piece of music)
  • Pitch bend wheel (Functionality that changes the sound wave of what you play and then returns to its original state)
  • Modulation wheel
  • A weight of 34 kg and dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes sustain pedal (The sustain pedal on a piano or keyboard is used to keep the note playing even if you stop pressing the key) GFP-30
  • Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA
  • XLR outputs
  • Helmets
  • Input for ‘Damper’/’Soft’ pedal
  • Input for Footswitch (configurable)
  • Input for Expression pedal (configurable)
  • USB input for pendrive and other devices

review kawai-mp-11

It is an excellent stage piano in the market for the price it has, its sound engine has a considerable amount of piano sounds, and its quality is really good. Any pianist who makes the purchase of a model like this cannot go wrong with the purchase.

Now that we have listed and described the features of this keyboard there is no better way than to take a look at the following video where they tell us more about the Kawai MP-11 and you can hear how its different sounds sound.

Related post you can be interested in

I especially like the pedalboard on this piano.

Now let’s compare the Kawai MP-11 with its more common alternatives. Also at the end of the post you will find a section with the best purchase possibilities for this keyboard. But you can go directly to that part of the post by pressing the next button.

Kawai MP-11 vs Kawai MP-11 SE

As we mentioned before, these two digital piano models are practically the same, only the MP 11 is the predecessor while the Kawai MP 11 SE is the successor and is still on the market. The only essential difference between the two is the difference in their keyboard technologies where that of the MP-11 SE is better and more up-to-date.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Kawai MP-11

Kawai MP-11 SE

  • 88 wooden weighted keys that imitate the feel of ivory very well. Keys with touch sensitivity very well achieved.
  • Grand Feel piano touch enhancement action with 3 sensors per key. One of the best acoustic piano simulations ever. Very successful (that’s why it’s worth it)
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 40 sounds
  • It includes 208 configuration memories to expand its possibilities even more
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • No speakers, but an amplifier simulator
  • DSP effects
  • Recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format. Also has USB MIDI and conventional MIDI
  • 128 x 64 pixel, self-lighted LCD display with good visibility
  • Metronome
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Modulation wheel
  • A weight of 34 kg and dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes GFP-30 sustain pedal
  • Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA
  • XLR outputs
  • Helmets
  • Input for ‘Damper’/’Soft’ pedal
  • Input for Footswitch (configurable)
  • Input for Expression pedal (configurable)
  • USB input for pendrive and other devices
  • 88 wooden keys with ivory touch surface
  • Grand Feel action with 3 sensors on each key and ‘Let-Off’ simulation
  • Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 40 sounds (Harmonic Imaging XL)
  • Configuration memories: 208
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • Amplifier simulator
  • DSP effects
  • Recording function: MIDI, mp3/WAV
  • Playback with loop function
  • 128 x 64 pixel backlit LCD display
  • Metronome
  • Pitch bend and modulation wheels
  • Dimensions: 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Weight: 34kg
  • Includes GFP-30 foot pedal
  • Line output (jack, L/mono+R or 2 mono)
  • XLR outputs with grounding
  • Headset
  • Damper/soft pedal input
  • Footswitch (assignable)
  • Expression (assignable)
  • MIDI in/out/thru
  • USB-Host
  • USB-Device

Now a video of the digital pianos:

Kawai MP-11 SE vs Yamaha CP4 Stage

We will now be buying the following digital pianos: the Kawai MP-11 SE which as mentioned above is priced at €2135/£1,998 and the Yamaha CP4 Stage which is priced at approximately €1500. With a difference close to €600 we will see their similarities and differences in the following face-to-face:

  • Both keyboards have 88 weighted and sensitive keys. Both keyboards have wood and a high quality touch, with different technologies between them. Weighted keyboard refers to the weight that the keys of a real acoustic piano have, in the low register it has heavy keys while in the high register it has light keys. Sensitivity refers to the fact that we can train dynamics in our musical performances, i.e. when we press a key with force it sounds louder and when we press it with less force it sounds lower.
  • In sound, we found that the Kawai has 40 sounds, and 256 notes of polyphony. When the Yamaha has 433 sounds and 128 notes of polyphony. In number of sounds it surpasses the Yamaha and in polyphony notes the Kawai. Polyphony refers to the highest number of notes that can be played simultaneously in a computer
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE’s signature features are: its Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine with the highly sought-after Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 Shigeru piano sounds. Pitch bend and modulation wheels, recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format, input for Damper/soft pedal, Footswitch (configurable), Expression pedal (configurable) and USB input for USB stick and other devices.
  • The functions that characterize the Yamaha CP4 Stage are: sound motors: SCM and AWM2, Pitch Bend and modulation wheels, 4 zone split function, dual or layer function, 2 controller pedal inputs and 2 sustain pedal inputs.
  • The Kawai offers the connections: Line output in all formats to connect to any amplifier or PA, XLR outputs, Headphone output. The Yamaha offers the connections: Stereo jack line outputs and Headset output.
  • Both digital pianos have USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer to be used as a MIDI controller in a music production or composition program.
  • The Kawai weighs 34 kg and has dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190 mm (W x D x H) and the Yamaha weighs 17.5 kg and has dimensions of 1332 x 161 x 352 mm.

We found a couple of good digital pianos, which have their advantages and disadvantages. The Kawai has a lower amount of sound but a higher amount of polyphony in its notes, while the Yamaha has a lower amount of polyphony but a higher amount of sound. Another relevant difference between the two pianos is their weight, the Kawai weighs 34 kg while the Yamaha weighs 17.5 kg, logically the Kawai will be much more difficult to transport due to its great weight.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Kawai MP-11 SE

Yamaha CP4 Stage

  • 88 wooden weighted keys that imitate the feel of ivory very well. Keys with very good touch sensitivity.
  • Grand Feel piano touch enhancement action with 3 sensors per key. One of the best acoustic piano simulations ever. Very successful (that’s why it’s worth it)
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 40 sounds
  • Includes 208 configuration memories to further expand your possibilities
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • No speakers, but an amplifier simulator
  • DSP effects
  • Recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format. Also has USB MIDI and conventional MIDI
  • 128 x 64 pixel, self-lighted LCD display with good visibility
  • Metronome
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Modulation wheel
  • A weight of 34 kg and dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes GFP-30 sustain pedal
  • Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA
  • XLR outputs
  • Helmets
  • Input for ‘Damper’/’Soft’ pedal
  • Input for Footswitch (configurable)
  • Input for Expression pedal (configurable)
  • USB input for pendrive and other devices
  • Weighted keyboard with high quality Wood Graded Hammer standard touch-sensitive keys. Very good indeed with the white wooden keys
  • 128 notes of polyphony
  • 433 sounds
  • Sound generation engine SCM and AWM2
  • 11 effects including reverb, chorus, etc
  • 128 Performances
  • Pitch Bend Wheels
  • Modulation wheel
  • 4 Zone Split function
  • Dual function or layer
  • LCD screen
  • Stereo jack line outputs
  • Hull exit
  • USB MIDI
  • Conventional MIDI
  • 2 sustain pedal inputs included
  • 2 inputs for controller pedals
  • a weight of 17.5 kg and dimensions of 1332 x 161 x 352 mm

And now a video of the Yamaha CP4 Stage:

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Yamaha CP4 Stage

Kawai MP-11 vs Kawai MP-7 SE

Now we will compare two Kawai branded keyboards: the Kawai MP-11 SE which as we mentioned before is priced at €2135/£1,998 and the Kawai MP-7 SE which is priced at €1325/£1,248, there being a difference of about €800 between them. We will then have the face-to-face of these digital keyboards:

  • Both keyboards have 88 weighted and sensitive keys. Both keyboards have wood and a high quality touch, with different technologies between them. Weighted keyboard refers to the weight that the keys of a real acoustic piano have, in the low register it has heavy keys while in the high register it has light keys. Sensitivity refers to the fact that we can train dynamics in our musical performances, i.e. when we press a key with force it sounds louder and when we press it with less force it sounds lower.
  • In sound, we found that the Kawai MP-11 SE has 40 sounds, and 256 notes of polyphony. When the Kawai MP-7 SE has 256 sounds and 256 notes of polyphony. In sound quantity it exceeds the Kawai MP-7 SE and in polyphony notes both have 256. Polyphony refers to the largest number of notes that can be played in a computer simultaneously.
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE is characterized by its Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine, which has the highly sought-after Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds. Pitch bend and modulation wheels, recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format, input for Damper/soft pedal, Footswitch (configurable), Expression pedal (configurable) and USB input for pendrive and other devices.
  • The Kawai MP-7 SE’s signature features are: its Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine with the highly sought-after Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds, mp3/WAV recording, ‘Virtual ToneWheel’ organ and 129 DSP-type effects.
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE provides the connections: Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA, XLR outputs, Headphone output. The Kawai MP-7 SE has the following connections: F-10H sustain pedal, Line Out Jack (L/Mono, R or 2 Mono), Line In Jack and Headset In.
  • Both digital pianos are equipped with USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer to be used as a MIDI controller in a music production or composition program.
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE weighs 34kg and measures 1380 x 452 x 190mm (W x D x H) and the Kawai MP-7 SE weighs 22.5kg and measures 1352 x 339 x 172mm (W x D x H).

Both digital pianos are very similar to each other. Starting with the keyboard, which has the same technology and therefore the same quality, and the Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine, which has the Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds, but here we find a big difference in the amount of sounds, the Kawai MP-11 SE offers 40 while the Kawai MP-7 offers 256 sounds. Another difference is found in the weight of both units, the MP11 weighs 34 kg while the MP7 weighs 22.5 kg, being noticeably lighter. As we see the Kawai MP-7 SE sounds better in many ways.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Kawai MP-11

Kawai MP-7

  • 88 wooden weighted keys that imitate the feel of ivory very well. Keys with very good touch sensitivity.
  • Grand Feel piano touch enhancement action with 3 sensors per key. One of the best acoustic piano simulations ever. Very successful (that’s why it’s worth it)
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 40 sounds
  • Includes 208 configuration memories to further expand your possibilities
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • No speakers, but an amplifier simulator
  • DSP effects
  • Recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format. Also has USB MIDI and conventional MIDI
  • 128 x 64 pixel, self-lighted LCD display with good visibility
  • Metronome
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Modulation wheel
  • A weight of 34 kg and dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes GFP-30 sustain pedal
  • Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA
  • XLR outputs
  • Helmets
  • Input for ‘Damper’/’Soft’ pedal
  • Input for Footswitch (configurable)
  • Input for Expression pedal (configurable)
  • USB input for pendrive and other devices
  • 88 weighted keys (RH3) that imitate the touch of ivory
  • Each key has three sensors to regulate the sensitivity
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 256 sounds
  • 256 possible settings for the sounds
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • 129 different effects and variations
  • It doesn’t have speakers but it has an amplifier simulator
  • DSP-type effects
  • Mp3/WAV recording possible
  • Fairly large LCD screen of 128 x 64 pixels
  • Metronome
  • Includes ‘Virtual ToneWheel’ Organ
  • Weight 22.5 kg and dimensions 1352 x 339 x 172mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes F-10H sustain pedal
  • Line output jack (L/Mono, R or 2 Mono) for connection to any amplifier equipment
  • Line input Jack
  • Helmet Entrance
  • It has USB MIDI and conventional
  • USB input for pendrives and devices

And now a video of the Kawai MP-7

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Kawai MP-7.

Kawai MP-11 SE vs Kawai ES-8

Now let’s compare these two Kawai brand digital pianos: the Kawai MP-11 SE which as we mentioned before is priced at €2135/£1,998 an1d the Kawai ES-8 with a price of €1.175/£1,099, having a difference aroudf €100 between them, we will see their similarities and differences in the next section:

  • Both keyboards have 88 weighted and sensitive keys. Both keyboards have wood and a high quality touch.
  • In sounds, we find that the Kawai MP-11 SE has 40 sounds, and 256 notes of polyphony. When the Kawai ES-8 has 34 sounds and 256 notes of polyphony, plus 100 styles that include variations. In number of sounds it exceeds the Kawai MP-11 SE and in polyphony notes both have 256. The Kawai ES8 also has preset styles.
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE features a Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine with the highly sought after Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 Shigeru piano sounds. Pitch bend and modulation wheels, recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format, input for Damper/soft pedal, Footswitch (configurable), Expression pedal (configurable) and USB input for USB stick and other devices.
  • The Kawai ES-8’s signature features are: its Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine with the highly sought-after Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds, mp3/WAV recording, ‘Virtual ToneWheel’ organ and 129 DSP-type effects. Sustain pedal input.
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE offers the connections: Line output in all formats to connect to any amplifier or PA, XLR outputs, Headphone output. The Kawai ES-8 has the following connections: F-10H sustain pedal, Line Out Jack (L/Mono, R or 2 Mono), Line In L and R, USB for connecting a pendrive, and powerful 15W speakers.
  • Both digital pianos are equipped with USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer to be used as a MIDI controller in a music production or composition program.
  • The Kawai MP-11 SE weighs 34kg and measures 1380 x 452 x 190mm (W x D x H) and the Kawai ES-8 weighs 22.5kg and measures 1362 x 361 x 149mm.

We really found two good digital stage pianos. With slight differences: The MP 11 SE has four more sounds, while the ES8 has a choice of styles. The MP-11 SE has more pedal inputs, while the MP-11 SE only has a sustain pedal input. Also in weight the MP-11 SE has a weight of 34Kg. when the ES8 weighs 22.5Kg, being the second lightest and most portable.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Kawai MP-11

Kawai ES-8

  • 88 wooden weighted keys that imitate the feel of ivory very well. Very successful touch-sensitive keys.
  • Grand Feel piano touch action with 3 sensors per key. One of the best acoustic piano simulations ever. Very successful (that’s why it’s worth it)
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 40 sounds
  • Includes 208 configuration memories to further expand your possibilities
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • No speakers, but an amplifier simulator
  • DSP effects
  • Recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format. Also has USB MIDI and conventional MIDI
  • 128 x 64 pixel, self-lighted LCD display with good visibility
  • Metronome
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Modulation wheel
  • A weight of 34 kg and dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes GFP-30 sustain pedal
  • Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA
  • XLR outputs
  • Helmets
  • Input for ‘Damper’/’Soft’ pedal
  • Input for Footswitch (configurable)
  • Input for Expression pedal (configurable)
  • USB input for pendrive and other devices
  • 88 touch-sensitive keys with three sensitivities and weighted keys. Its technology is known as hammer action ‘Hammer III’ (RHIII)
  • Harmonic Imaging XL’ Technology
  • 34 sounds
  • It has 256 notes max. in polyphony
  • 100 styles including variations
  • Transposition
  • Tuning
  • String response simulation
  • Dual mode
  • Split function
  • Duo mode for 4 hands
  • Recording up to two tracks
  • Metronome
  • 2 helmet jacks and duo mode
  • MIDI input and output
  • L and R line input ideal for inserting another instrument or player
  • Mono and stereo line output so you can play with any amplification system without any extras. Ideal for live performances
  • Also USB MIDI
  • USB for connecting a pendrive or other device
  • 2 very powerful 15″ speakers Which are even good for playing in a restaurant without extra amplification
  • It has a weight of 22.5kg and dimensions of 1362 x 361 x 149mm (width x depth x height). It can be comfortably carried by car but is difficult to carry by public transport
  • Color: Black
  • It has a F10H sustain pedal and also a lectern

And now a video of the Kawai ES-8

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Kawai ES-8.

Kawai MP-11 SE vs Roland FP-30

Our latest comparison has the following digital pianos the Kawai MP-11 SE at a price of €2135/£1,998, and the Roland FP30 which is priced at €619/£555. There is a large difference of almost €1500 between the two. We will therefore see their similarities and differences:

  • Both keyboards have 88 weighted and sensitive keys. Both keyboards haveN a high quality touch, with different technologies between them.
  • In sound, we find that the Kawai has 40 sounds, and 256 notes of polyphony. When the Roland has 35 sounds and 128 notes of polyphony and 8 rhythms. In quantity of sounds and notes of polyphony the Kawai surpasses.
  • The functions that characterize the Kawai MP-11 SE are: its Harmonic Imaging XL sound engine that has the highly sought after Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds. Pitch bend and modulation wheels, recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format, input for Damper / Soft pedal, Footswitch (configurable), Expression pedal (configurable) and USB input for USB stick and other devices.
  • The functions that characterize the Roland are: its SuperNATURAL sound engine, Includes sustain pedal and extra input for another pedal, Split function, Dual function, Duo mode, Includes microphone input, Recording in SMF format and USB playback of audio (WAV 44.1 / 16 bits) and MIDI.
  • The Kawai offers the connections: Line output in all formats to connect to any amplifier or PA, XLR outputs, Headset output. The Roland offers the connections: Stereo jack line outputs and Headset output, plus powerful 11W speakers.
  • Both digital pianos are equipped with USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer to be used as a MIDI controller in a music production or composition program.
  • The Kawai weighs 34kg and measures 1380 x 452 x 190mm (W x D x H) and the Roland weighs 14.1kg and measures 130 x 28.4 x 15cm.

Considering the large price difference, the Roland FP 30 is not surprising thanks to its functions and features that in many cases are almost equal to those of the Kawai MP-11 SE, as in the case of the sounds the Kawai offers 40 and the Roland offers 35. In the following functions and features it surpasses the Kawai, and because of the price difference, no less is expected. Although for the price the Roland FP 30 is not bad at all.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences. Although it has to be said that there is quite a difference considering that the MP11 costs almost 4 times more than the Roland, but it is good to take a look and see what each one brings:

Kawai MP-11

Roland FP-30

  • 88 wooden weighted keys that imitate the feel of ivory very well. Keys with very good touch sensitivity.
  • Grand Feel piano touch enhancement action with 3 sensors per key. One of the best acoustic piano simulations ever made. Very successful (that’s why it’s worth it)
  • Includes the famous Shigeru Kawai SK-EX and SK-5 piano sounds
  • 40 sounds
  • Includes 208 configuration memories to further expand your possibilities
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • No speakers, but an amplifier simulator
  • DSP effects
  • Recording in MIDI, mp3/WAV format. Also has USB MIDI and conventional MIDI
  • 128 x 64 pixel, self-lighted LCD display with good visibility
  • Metronome
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Modulation wheel
  • A weight of 34 kg and dimensions of 1380 x 452 x 190mm (width x depth x height)
  • Includes GFP-30 sustain pedal
  • Line output in all formats for connection to any amplifier or PA
  • XLR outputs
  • Helmets
  • Input for ‘Damper’/’Soft’ pedal
  • Input for Footswitch (configurable)
  • Input for Expression pedal (configurable)
  • USB input for pendrive and other devices
  • 88 touch-sensitive weighted keys
  • Its PHA-IV system emulates the ivory touch and leakage
  • Supernatural Sound Engine
  • Integrated Bluetooth 4.0 connection
  • 128 notes of polyphony
  • 35 sounds
  • 8 rhythms
  • Split function
  • Dual function
  • Duo mode
  • Includes microphone
  • USB MIDI connection
  • Recording in SMF format
  • USB audio (WAV 44.1 / 16 bit) and MIDI playback
  • Illuminated user interface
  • Powerful speaker system with 11W
  • Includes sustain pedal and extra input for another pedal
  • It also has the lectern and the network connector
  • It weighs 14.1 kg and measures 130 x 28.4 x 15 cm (width x depth x height)

Now for our video review of the Roland FP30:

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Roland FP-30.

Where to buy Kawai MP 11

Thomann

  • Free Shipping.
  • Full warranty. If you have any problems, they take care of everything.
  • 100% reliable payment.
  • Leader in trouble-free shipping.
  • Usually Best price.
  • Best Reputation: They are the leading online store in Europe and have the best catalogue and information.

Amazon

  • Free Shipping and possibility of shipping in one day with Amazon Premium.
  • Full Guarantee but they are no experts in music equipment.
  • Sometimes better price.
  • He’s got worse stock than Thomann.

Check below related models with similar price and features:

Jaime Echagüe

Hi! I'm Jaime Echagüe, a musician and an authentic fan of musical instruments. With this blog I want to give general information about musical instruments in an easy, direct and honest way. I hope you enjoy my website and that you find it very useful.

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