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Digital Piano Korg Grandstage 88 Full Review. Is it a good choice?

Digital Piano Korg Grandstage 88 Review Complete. Is it a good chance?

Korg is a Japanese company of electronic musical instruments and accessories for electric guitar. Today we will analyze the Korg Grandstage 88 digital piano that has a price of What is a digital stage piano and offers us everything a pianist needs to play live. We will see its features in the next section:

  • 88 weighted keys (Weight that the keys of an acoustic piano have and that digital pianos try to imitate to equal the touch of the piano. The keys in the high register are heavier and in the high register less. This is different from the sensitivity on the keyboard which serves to regulate the volume of the note. But a weighted keyboard always has sensitivity in the keys) with Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 touch and velocity sensitive technology. We will talk more specifically about the keyboard and its technology later on.
  • It brings five concert grand piano sounds and several upright piano sounds. Watch videos to hear the sound quality.
  • 128 notes of polyphony (Number of notes that can be played at once. This includes accompaniments that also consume notes. So if you play over an accompaniment more notes will be accumulated) maximum with 7 sound engines
  • 500 sounds (Different sounds of piano and other instruments)
  • 2 screens with OLED technology
  • 3-band equalizer and 4 insert effects
  • Reverb Effects (Reverb Effect)
  • Delay effects
  • Split function (dividing the keyboard into two different instruments) and dual
  • Modulation wheel
  • Pitch bend wheel (Functionality that changes the sound wave of what you play and then returns to its original state)
  • Includes power cable and music stand (Standard-M-SV)
  • Includes ‘Damper’ pedal (DS-1H) which is a sustain pedal (The sustain pedal of a piano or keyboard is used to keep the note playing even if you stop pressing the key)
  • 2 balanced Canon XLR stereo line outputs
  • 2 line jack outputs
  • Stereo headset jack output
  • It has tickets for Damper, Switch and Pedal
  • USB-A input for pendrives
  • USB midi (MIDI allows you to do such wonderful things as connect your keyboard to your computer, record a sound track and with certain programs click through what you’ve played to musical notes on a score. MIDI tracks store the information of the musical notes)
  • A weight of 20 kg and dimensions of 1311 x 359 x 140mm

demo review korg-grandstage-88

We are in a range of very professional pianos. With a very good amount of effects and a lot of quality in the materials and in the sounds. However, I encourage you to look at the comparisons below. Because there are some very interesting keyboards that you have to see if you are going to spend that money.

Related post you can be interested in

Now let’s compare the Korg Grandstage 88 with its more common alternatives. Also at the end of the post you will find a section with the best shopping possibilities for this digital piano. But you can go directly to that part of the post by pressing the following button.

Korg Grandstage 88 vs Korg SV1 88

We will now make a comparison of two Korg digital pianos: The Korg Grandstage 88 which has a value of €1.969/$2200/£1,799 and the Korg SV 2 88 which has a price of €1.969/$2000/£1,799 , giving a difference of almost £230 between them. We will see their similarities and differences in the following face-to-face:

  • Both digital pianos have 88 weighted keys with RHA (Real Hammer Action) 3 technology and touch sensitivity and speed. Remember that the weighted keyboard is the weight that the keys of an acoustic piano have, in the low range it has heavy keys and in the high range it has light keys. Sensitivity is the function of being able to create dynamics in our interpretations. That is to say that when we press a key with force it sounds high and while we press a key with little force it sounds lower.
  • The Grandstage 88 has 500 sounds, three of which are concert grand pianos and several upright pianos, the others are other instruments. It also has 128 notes of maximum polyphony and seven of sound motors. The SV1 88 has 36 sounds 2 of Grand Piano and the others of Electric Pianos and other instruments. It offers 80 notes of polyphony and has the Enhanced Definition Synthesis Sound Engine. Polyphony refers to the largest number of notes that can be played at the same time in a computer.
  • In terms of effects, the Grandstage 88 has a 3-band EQ and four insert effects. In addition there is a Reverb and Delay section with 4 types of each. In the SV 1 88 we have more variety: 4 Insert Effects + 2 Master Effects, 3-band EQ, Pre FX: Compressor, Boost, U-Vibe, Vibrato, Tremolo, VoxWah, Amplifier and Cabinets with Valve Reactor Technology and a 12AX7 Valve (ECC83), in modulation effects: Chorus1, Chorus2, Phaser1, Phaser2, Flanger, Rotary. In Reverb/Delay: Room, Plate, Hall, Spring, Tape Echo, Stereo Delay.
  • Other features of the Grandstage 88 are: modulation and pitch bend wheels (which serve to change the modulation and height of a note while playing), split and dual function, input from: damper, switch and pedal, 2 balanced XLR outputs and 2 unbalanced plug outputs, and USB input for USB flash drives.
  • Other functions of SV 1 88 are: its Real eXperience technology, 8 memory spaces to store favorites, Korg DS-2H type sustain pedal, outputs for headphones, jack inputs and outputs (unbalanced) and XLR (balanced), 8 sensitivity and speed curves and USB input for USB flash drives.
  • Both digital pianos have USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer, to be used as controllers in a production or music composition program.
  • The Grandstage weighs 20kg and measures 1311 x 359 x 140mm, while the SV 1 weighs 17.5kg and measures 1143 x 347 x 154mm.

As we can see, both are good options for digital pianos with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The Grandstage has a large number of sounds and polyphony, as well as modulation and pitch bend wheels, and seven sound generators. While the SV 1: has Real eXperience technology, 8 spaces to store Presets, AND a great amount of effects for its different functions, remembering its technology and a great amount of effects for its different voices, we also highlight its Valve Reactor technology where it uses a 12AX7 vacuum tube for the simulation of amplifiers and cabinets.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Korg Grandstage 88

Korg SV1 88

  • 88 weighted keys with Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 technology for touch and speed
  • Bring five concert grand pianos and several upright pianos
  • 128 notes of maximum polyphony with 7 sound engines
  • 500 sounds
  • 2 screens with OLED technology
  • 3-band equalizer and 4 insertion effects
  • Reverb Effects
  • Delay effects
  • Split and dual function
  • Modulation wheel
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Includes power cable and music stand (Standard-M-SV)
  • Includes Damper pedal (DS-1H) which is a sustain pedal
  • 2 balanced Canon XLR stereo line outputs
  • 2 line jack outputs
  • Stereo headphone jack output
  • It has tickets for Damper, Switch and Pedal
  • USB-A input for pendrives
  • USB MIDI
  • Weight 20 kg and dimensions 1311 x 359 x 140mm
  • Vintage aesthetics
  • 88 RH3 weighted keys
  • 80 notes of polyphony
  • 36 sounds
  • 8 Sensitivity and Speed Curves
  • Tuning and transposition function
  • Enhanced Definition Synthesis sound engine and Real eXperience technology
  • 8 memory spaces for saving favorites and settings
  • 1 x 12AX7 valve on the preamp
  • 36 demo songs
  • DS-2H Korg type sustain pedal
  • Hull exit
  • JACK and XLR line input and output
  • MIDI input and output
  • USB to connect pendrive
  • It has a lectern and a network cable
  • a weight of 17.5kg and a size of 1143 x 347 x 154mm

First a video explaining the operation of the RHA3 system, where you can find graduated and heavy hammers, according to the different regions of keys. In the low register you will find red hammers of greater weight and dimension, which simulate the long and heavy strings of an acoustic piano in this range of notes. In the mid-bass range there are blue hammers and in the mid-high range there are green hammers. Reaching the high note range we find hammers with less dimension and weight simulating the short and lighter strings of an acoustic piano in the same note range.

And now a video of the Korg SV1 88, where you can see the quality of its sounds:

The pianos sound great, the touch of the keys is perfect and very easy to use despite the many functions it offers. A great choice for both rehearsing and playing live.

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Korg SV1 73.

Korg Grandstage 88 vs Yamaha CP4 Stage

Now we will buy two high quality digital pianos: the Korg Grandstage 88 which as we have seen is priced at €1.969/$2200/£1,799 and the Yamaha CP 4 Stage which is priced at €1829, with a difference of £140 between them, we will also analyse their similarities and differences in the next face-to-face:

  • Both digital pianos have 88 weighted and touch-sensitive keys. The Korg with RHA 3 technology and the Yamaha with its Wood Graded Hammer technology (black synthetic ebony keys and white real wood keys). Remember that the weighted keyboard is the weight of the keys of an acoustic piano, in the low range it has heavy keys and in the high range it has light keys. Sensitivity is the function of being able to create dynamics in our interpretations. That is to say that when we press a key with force it sounds high and while we press a key with little force it sounds lower.
  • The Grandstage 88 has 500 sounds, three of which are concert grand pianos and several upright pianos, the others are other instruments. It also has 128 notes of maximum polyphony and seven of sound motors. The Yamaha has 433 sounds, 15 from the Yamaha CFX and 15 from the CF, the rest from other instruments. It also has 128 notes of polyphony and two sound engines: SCM and AWM2.
  • In terms of effects, the Grandstage 88 has a 3-band Equalizer and four insertion effects. Also a Reverb and Delay section with 4 types of each. The Yamaha has reverb (11 types), chorus (9 types), Master EQ, a 5-band EQ and 62 types of Insert Effects.
  • Other features of the Grandstage 88 are: modulation and pitch bend wheels (which serve to change the modulation and pitch of a note while playing), split and dual function, input from: damper, switch and pedal, 2 balanced XLR outputs and 2 unbalanced plug outputs, and USB input for USB flash drives.
  • Other functions of the Yamaha CP4 are: Pitch Bend wheels, Modulation wheel, 4 zone split function, dual or layer function, two inputs for sustain pedals, two inputs for controller pedals, stereo jack line outputs, and headphone outputs.
  • Both digital pianos are equipped with USB MIDI, which allows them to be connected to a computer, to be used as controllers in a music production or composition program.
  • The Grandstage weighs 20 kg and has dimensions of 1311 x 359 x 140 mm, while the Yamaha weighs 17.5 kg and has dimensions of 1332 x 161 x 352 mm.

We are looking at two high-quality, high-performance digital pianos with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The Korg Grandstage 88 has: a slightly higher sound output, an input for three pedals, two XLR balanced main outputs and a USB input for USB flash drives. And the Yamaha CP4 stage has: white keys with real wood and black keys with synthetic ebony, greatly increasing its simulation in real acoustic piano and a lighter weight that allows greater portability. So you can compare the sound quality of each one we invite you to watch the Videos.
We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Korg Grandstage 88

Yamaha CP4 Stage

  • 88 weighted keys with Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 technology for touch and speed
  • Bring five concert grand pianos and several upright pianos
  • 128 notes of maximum polyphony with 7 sound engines
  • 500 sounds
  • 2 screens with OLED technology
  • 3-band equalizer and 4 insertion effects
  • Reverb Effects
  • Delay effects
  • Split and dual function
  • Modulation wheel
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Includes power cable and music stand (Standard-M-SV)
  • Includes ‘Damper’ pedal (DS-1H) which is a sustain pedal
  • 2 balanced Canon XLR stereo line outputs
  • 2 line jack outputs
  • Stereo headset jack output
  • It has tickets for Damper, Switch and Pedal
  • USB-A input for pendrives
  • USB MIDI
  • A weight of 20 kg and dimensions of 1311 x 359 x 140mm
  • Weighted keyboard with high-quality touch-sensitive keys with Wood Graded Hammer standard. Very good indeed with the white wooden keys
  • 128 notes of polyphony
  • 433 sounds
  • Sound generation engine SCM and AWM2
  • 11 effects including reverb, chorus, etc
  • 128 Performances
  • Pitch Bend Wheels
  • Modulation wheel
  • 4 Zone Split function
  • Dual function or layer
  • LCD screen
  • Stereo jack line outputs
  • Hull output
  • USB MIDI
  • Conventional MIDI
  • 2 sustain pedal inputs included
  • 2 inputs for controller pedals
  • a weight of 17.5 kg and dimensions of 1332 x 161 x 352 mm

And now a video of the Yamaha CP4 Stage

 

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Yamaha CP4 Stage

Korg Grandstage 88 vs Clavia Nord Piano 4

Now we will have the comparison of these two digital pianos: the Korg Grandstage 88 which as we have seen is priced at €1.969/$2200/£1,799 and the Clavia Nord Piano 4 which is priced at €2.399/$3000/£2,199, with a valuable difference of €430. So like the others we will put them face to face to see their similarities and differences, let’s get to it:

  • Both digital pianos have 88 weighted, touch-sensitive keys. The Korg with RHA 3 technology and the Nord has a TRI-SENSOR system called Virtual Hammer-Action.
  • The Grandstage 88 has 500 sounds, three of which are concert grand pianos and several upright pianos, the others are other instruments. It also has 128 notes of maximum polyphony and seven of sound motors. The Clavia Nord has 1 Gb of storage in the Piano Nord Library where you can find a large number of piano samples with 120 notes of polyphony, and 512 Gb of storage in the Nord Sample Library, where you can find a large number of samples of various instruments with 150 notes of polyphony.
  • In terms of effects, the Grandstage 88 has a 3-band EQ and four insert effects. In addition there is a Reverb and Delay section with 4 types of each. The Nord has the effects included: Tremolo, Phaser, Chorus, Pan, Wah, RM, Flanger, Vibe, EQ, Delay and Reverb with a new Bright Mode. Having a great advantage over the Korg.
  • Other features of the Grandstage 88 are: modulation and pitch bend wheels (which serve to change the modulation and height of a note while playing), split and dual function, input from: damper, switch and pedal, 2 balanced XLR outputs and 2 unbalanced plugs, and USB input for USB flash drives.
  • Other functions of the Clavia Nord Piano 4 are: Seamless Transitions for seamless program changes, 7 point Split with optional Crossfade function, Revised Organize Mode for quick program organization, Numeric Pad Mode for direct program access, Triple Pedal Nord quality Triple Pedal, Volume Pedal input, One Headphone output, Mini jack monitor input, and Stereo jack output.
  • Both digital pianos have USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer, to be used as controllers in a music production or composition program.
  • The Grandstage weighs 20 kg and measures 1311 x 359 x 140 mm, while the Nord weighs 20 kg (with pedal) and measures 1287 x 121 x 340 mm

We clearly found two excellent proposals for digital pianos. That to be fair with its price and features the Nord wins the battle, and not for nothing being one of the best selling digital stage pianos in recent years. With a great amount of sounds that it offers us, an extensive series of effects, and its functions of: Seamless Transitions for seamless program changes, 7 Split points with optional Crossfade function, revised Organize Mode for quick program organization, Numeric Pad Mode for direct access to programs. In addition to the triple footswitch input. They make this instrument a true wonder for any pianist. And of course we will have all this at a price that not everyone is willing to pay.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Korg Grandstage 88

Clavia Nord Piano 4

  • 88 weighted keys with Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 technology for touch and speed
  • Bring five concert grand pianos and several upright pianos
  • 128 notes of maximum polyphony with 7 sound engines
  • 500 sounds
  • 2 screens with OLED technology
  • 3-band equalizer and 4 insertion effects
  • Reverb Effects
  • Delay effects
  • Split and dual function
  • Modulation wheel
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Includes power cable and music stand (Standard-M-SV)
  • Includes ‘Damper’ pedal (DS-1H) which is a sustain pedal
  • 2 balanced Canon XLR stereo line outputs
  • 2 line jack outputs
  • Stereo headset jack output
  • It has tickets for Damper, Switch and Pedal
  • USB-A input for pendrives
  • USB MIDI
  • A weight of 20 kg and dimensions of 1311 x 359 x 140mm
  • 88-key weighted keyboard with touch-sensitive keys
  • It imitates very well the hammer mechanism of an acoustic piano and has a TRI-SENSOR system called Virtual Hammer-Action
  • Display screen with improved visualization (very remarkable). We are talking about one of the most purchased professional stage pianos
  • 1 GB of memory storage for Nord Piano sound library
  • 512 MB in memory for the Nord Sample sound library
  • Sound changes without any interruption in the sound. This is the Seamless Transitions system
  • 120 notes of polyphony and 30 extra for the synthesizer part
  • Optimized and easy administration of programs and samples
  • Numeric Pad mode for super-fast live program selection
  • Layer and Split functionality in the three keyboard registers
  • Filters that allow you to customize the sounds to very advanced levels
  • quality Nord Triple Pedal which of course includes the sustain
  • All effects in stereo
  • Three types of Reverb effect with Bright option
  • Mini-jack monitor input very useful for live performances
  • 1 Jack helmet output
  • 1 JACK input for the pedal board
  • Also a Jack TRS volume pedal input
  • Conventional MIDI input and output
  • It also has USB MIDI
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): 1287 x 121 x 340 mm, pedal: 264 x 224 x 70 mm
  • With the pedal it weighs about 20 kg so it is portable but with a car.
  • It has a power cable, the triple pedal board and a lot of software with extras on DVDs

First a video comparison of both digital pianos, so you can hear their most relevant sounds:

And now a video of the Clavia Nord Piano 4

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Clavia Nord Piano 4.

Korg Grandstage 88 vs Roland RD-2000

Finally we will have the comparison of the digital pianos: the Korg Grandstage 88 Y as we have commented in previous occasions has a price of €1.969/$2200/£1,799 and the Roland RD-2000 that has a price of €2.290/$2600/£2,090. Having a difference between them of €320, knowing this we will analyze their similarities and differences in the next face:

  • Both digital pianos have 88 weighted, touch-sensitive keys. The Korg with the RHA 3 technology and the Roland with the PHA-50 technology of hybrid construction between wood and plastic, with ebony and ivory touch, with exhaust (Excellent feeling), which in a later video tests the counterbalance levels.
  • The Grandstage 88 has 500 sounds, three of which are concert grand pianos and several upright pianos, the others are other instruments. It also has 128 notes of maximum polyphony and seven of sound motors. The Roland offers more than 1110 sounds from other piano instruments, generated by two sound engines and the acoustic sound engine apart from being very real has total polyphony ie no limits.
  • In terms of effects, the Grandstage 88 has a 3-band equalizer and four insert effects. In addition there is a Reverb and Delay section with 4 types of each. The Roland has the following effects: Modulation: 4 systems and 62 types. Tremolo/Amplifier Simulator: 4 systems and 6 types, Reverb: 6 types, Delay: 5 types, 3-band Compressor and a 5-band Digital Equalizer.
  • Other features of the Grandstage 88 are: modulation and pitch bend wheels (which are used to change the modulation and pitch of a note while playing), split and dual function, input from: damper, switch and pedal, 2 balanced XLR outputs and 2 unbalanced plug outputs, and USB input for USB flash drives.
  • Other functions of the Roland are: 9 Sliders (faders) with lighting, 8 knobs with lighting, pitch bend wheels and modulation, you can split into 8 different zones to configure each with the instruments and programs to choose, input for USB flash drives to increase storage and have more sounds, input for Damper pedal, Sustain FC1 and FC2, an output for headphones, mini jack monitor input, and stereo output jack and XLR.
  • Both digital pianos have USB MIDI which allows them to be connected to a computer, to be used as a controller in a music production or composition program.
  • The Grandstage weighs 20 kg and measures 1311 x 359 x 140 mm, while the Roland weighs 21.7 kg and measures 1412 x 367 x 140 mm

They are two excellent options as digital stage pianos, however in this face-to-face we also find a clear winner which is the Roland RD-2000. With its features such as: PHA-50 keyboard and its hybrid technology, the incredible amount of more than 1100 sounds and its sound quality, a total polyphony, the option to make Split in eight different zones along the keyboard, the capacity of storage expansion through USB sticks, the large number of effects with which it is integrated, several pedal inputs and its weight that even though it is about 22 kg is still considered portable, in a car. All this makes the Roland RD-2000 one of the best digital pianos for the stage.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Korg Grandstage 88

Roland RD-2000

  • 88 weighted keys with Real Weighted Hammer Action 3 touch and speed-sensitive technology
  • Bring five concert grand pianos and several upright pianos
  • 128 notes of maximum polyphony with 7 sound engines
  • 500 sounds
  • 2 screens with OLED technology
  • 3-band equalizer and 4 insertion effects
  • Reverb Effects
  • Delay effects
  • Split and dual function
  • Modulation wheel
  • Pitch bend wheel
  • Includes power cable and music stand (Standard-M-SV)
  • Includes ‘Damper’ pedal (DS-1H) which is a sustain pedal
  • 2 balanced Canon XLR stereo line outputs
  • 2 line jack outputs
  • Stereo headset output
  • It has tickets for Damper, Switch and Pedal
  • USB-A input for pendrives
  • USB MIDI
  • A weight of 20 kg and dimensions of 1311 x 359 x 140mm
  • PHA-50 weighted keyboard of molded hybrid construction with part of the actual mechanism of a piano This synthesizer piano is very popular although not as popular as the Nord Stage or the Yamaha Genos
  • 2 sound engines and advanced real-time control possibilities
  • The acoustic sound engine is very very real and total polyphony
  • Second supernatural engine with 128 notes of polyphony
  • Eight knobbed wheel controls and nine slider controls for sound parameter control
  • You can split into 8 different zones and configure each one with the instruments and programs you want
  • Of course layer function
  • 1113 sounds including mythical acoustic pianos
  • Many vintage tones sampled in near-analog quality
  • Over 1100 sounds from other wind instruments and everything you need
  • Two holes to expand the amount of sounds you can download from Roland’s website
  • 100 settings you can program to retrieve in one click
  • Lever for traditional Roland pitch and modulation and two assignable wheel controllers
  • 2 assignable drivers like Picth Bend or whatever you want
  • USB MIDI output
  • Stereo Jack and XLR line output
  • a brutal amount of effects with the typical reverb, chorus, etc
  • Stereo mini-jack input
  • Several stereo ‘damper’ or sustain inputs, fc1, fc2
  • MIDI connectors (in, out1, thru/out2)
  • USB port for external storage
  • Stereo headset jack output
  • AC power input jack
  • A weight of 21.7 kg and dimensions of 1412 x 367 x 140mm (width x depth x height)
  • Powered by Jack and does not include a sustain pedal or built-in speakers

A video to test the counterweight of the PHA-50 keyboard:

And now a video of the Roland RD-2000

 

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Roland RD-2000.

Where to buy Korg Grandstage 88

Thomann

  • Free Shipping.
  • Full warranty. If you have any problems, they take care of everything.
  • 100% reliable payment.
  • Leader in trouble-free shipping.
  • Usually Best price.
  • Best Reputation: They are the leading online store in Europe and have the best catalogue and information.

Amazon

  • Free Shipping and possibility of shipping in one day with Amazon Premium.
  • Full Guarantee but they are no experts in music equipment.
  • Sometimes better price.
  • He’s got worse stock than Thomann.

Check below related models with similar price and features:

Jaime Echagüe

Hi! I'm Jaime Echagüe, a musician and an authentic fan of musical instruments. With this blog I want to give general information about musical instruments in an easy, direct and honest way. I hope you enjoy my website and that you find it very useful.

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