review casio-px-870

Review and Opinion of the Casio PX-870 Privia and Where to Buy It

Casio is a Japanese manufacturer of electronic devices, including digital pianos. This time we will look at the Casio PX-870 Privia, a digital piano with a cabinet included and with very good features and functions that meet the needs of any pianist. Its selling price is €799/$999/£735.

The Casio PX-87o Privia with its 88 weighted, pressure-sensitive keys, 256 polyphonic notes and the possibility of customisation similar to an acoustic piano is a very interesting option for any pianist.

And its features are:

  • 88 weighted keys (Weight that the keys of an acoustic piano have and that digital pianos try to imitate to equal the touch of the piano. The keys in the high register are heavier and in the high register less. This is different from the sensitivity on the keyboard which serves to regulate the volume of the note. But a weighted keyboard always has sensitivity in the keys) with Scaled Hammer Action II (Tri-Sensor) technology and that emulates the touch of synthetic ebony/ivory
  • 19 sounds (Different sounds of piano and other instruments)
  • Extra Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR chip
  • Volume Sync EQ’ and ‘Headphone’ modes for regulating bass and treble for pianists who want to play quite loud
  • 256 notes of polyphony (Number of notes that can be played at once. This includes accompaniments that also consume notes. So if you play over an accompaniment more notes will be accumulated)
  • Dual function (Dual mode allows you to combine two sounds to create a more complete one. The combination of piano + stringed instrument sound is typical)
  • Split function (dividing the keyboard into two different instruments)
  • DSP (Digital Signal Processing) effects. These are digital effects that modify the sound of the keyboard), chorus and ‘Brilliance’ effect
  • Extra concert performance effects and hammer response to enhance the acoustic piano feeling
  • Resonance dampening effect
  • Recording function
  • 60 songs
  • Transposition (Transposition allows you to move the note spectrum of a keyboard. This is to be able to play with transposing instruments. It is not an easy concept but it is made to facilitate the writing of an orchestration for instruments with very different bass and treble registers)
  • Metronome (Basic study element for studying and practicing the tempo of a piece of music)
  • Duo mode (Duo mode allows the keyboard to be divided into two pianos so that four hands can be played or the teacher and student can play on the same keyboard)
  • 2 hull exits
  • Cover that imitates an acoustic piano
  • Triple pedalboard
  • USB to Host
  • USB to device for connecting flash drives
  • Very powerful 20W speakers (various piano and other instrument sounds)
  • Weight 35.5 kg and dimensions with stand 1367 x 299 x 837mm (H x W x D)
  • Weight: 35,5kg
  • It has a lectern
  • Includes power supply

demo test review casio-px-870-privia

Now that we’ve listed and described the features of this keyboard, there’s no better way than to take a look at the following videos where they tell us more about the Casio PX-870 Privia and you can hear how its different sounds sound.

Related post you can be interested in

Now let’s compare the Casio PX 870 with its more common alternatives. Also at the end of the post you will find a section with the best shopping possibilities for this digital piano. But you can go directly to that part of the post by pressing the following button.

Casio PX-870 Privia vs Casio PX-770 Privia

First we will have a comparison between two Casio-branded digital pianos: The Casio PX-870 Privia with a price of €799/$999/£735 and the Casio PX-770 Privia with a price of €639/£579 has a difference of £100 between the two. Depending on their functions and features, we’ll see which one works best for you:

  • Both have 88 weighted keys with Scaled Hammer Action II technology in Tri-sensor II scale (keys in ivory and mahogany imitation). Counterweight, is the weight given to the keys of a digital piano to simulate those of a real acoustic piano. The bass keys are a little heavier than the treble keys. Scaled Hammer Action II technology will be reviewed in detail later in a video.
  • The keys also have 3 levels of sensitivity. Sensitivity refers to the option to give dynamics to the performances, when a key is pressed strongly it sounds louder than another key played less strongly.
  • Both pianos offer 19 different sounds, which are generated by the multidimensional AiR engine, which will be analyzed in a video later.
  • The Casio PX-870 has 256 notes of polyphony while the Casio PX 770 has 128 notes of polyphony. The former is the most effective in this area. Remember that polyphony is the largest number of notes that can be played at the same time.
  • Both pianos have Split, Dual, Duo functions and have DSP (Digital Signal Process) effects such as: Chorus, Reverb and Brillance. In addition to Mute Resonance, Hammer Response, Mute Noise, functions that allow the simulation of a real acoustic piano to be optimized.
  • Both have a triple footswitch that is ideal for the conservatory studio, have a MIDI recording function, and only the Casio PX-870 has audio recording in WAV format.
  • Both have a USB-to-host connection, allowing them to be connected to a computer for use as a MIDI controller in a music composition or production program. However, only the Casio PX-870 has a USB-to-host connection for connecting flash drives.
  • In terms of speakers, the Casio PX-870 has two 20 W speakers, while the Casio PX-770 has two 8 W speakers.
  • In terms of weight and dimensions, the Casio PX-870 weighs 35.5 kg and its dimensions are 1367 × 299 × 837 mm (H x W x D). The Casio PX-770 weighs 31.5 kg and measures 1391 × 299 × 798 mm (H x W x D). Remember that both pianos have furniture included, so their weight is relatively portable.

As we can see, we find very similar digital pianos with the same audio generator, therefore the same sounds. The advantages that we find in the Casio PX-870 are: the 250 notes of polyphony, the option of recording audio in WAV format and a power of 20 W allowing calmly have a rehearsal with other musicians without external amplification. Which for $100 more is not bad at all.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Casio PX-870 Privia

Casio PX-770 Privia

  • 88 weighted keys with Scaled Hammer Action II (Tri-Sensor) technology that emulates synthetic ebony/ivory touch
  • 19 sounds
  • Extra Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR chip
  • Volume Sync EQ’ and ‘Headphone’ modes for regulating bass and treble for pianists who want to play quite loud
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • Dual function
  • Split function
  • DSP effects, chorus and ‘Brilliance’ effect
  • Extra concert performance effects and hammer response to enhance the acoustic piano feeling
  • Resonance dampening effect
  • Recording function
  • 60 songs
  • Transposition
  • Metronome
  • Duo mode
  • 2 hull exits
  • Cover that imitates an acoustic piano
  • Triple pedalboard
  • USB to Host
  • USB to device for connecting flash drives
  • Very powerful 20W speakers
  • Weight 35.5 kg and dimensions with stand 1367 x 299 x 837mm (H x W x D)
  • Weight: 35,5kg
  • It has a lectern and includes a power supply
  • 88 weighted hammer action keys with standard Scaled Hammer Action II (Tri-Sensor
  • The keys simulate synthetic ivory
  • 19 sounds
  • Extra Processing Chip Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR
  • 128 notes of polyphony
  • Dual function
  • Split function
  • Different effects: DSP, chorus, reverb and ‘Brilliance
  • Resonance dampening effect to improve the real acoustic piano feeling
  • 60 pre-recorded songs
  • Duo mode
  • Transposition
  • Metronome
  • Integrated triple footswitch with the ideal conservatory support
  • 2 headphone sockets for duo mode
  • USB to Host Port
  • MIDI recorder with two tracks
  • 2 very powerful 8W speakers
  • Dimensions with stand 1391 x 299 x 798mm (H x W x D)
  • Total weight of 31.5kg making it half portable
  • Bring score book, music stand and power supply

A video about the Scaled Hammer Action (Tri-Sensor) II technology, which as explained, uses hammer action just as real acoustic pianos do without using any springs. The keys respond solidly and naturally. With Tri-Sensor technology we can have more control over the sensitivity of the notes.

A video of Casio’s AiR generator comes from Acoustic and Intelligent Resonator, which reproduces the resonances of an acoustic concert piano. It also reproduces sounds using the Linear Morphing technique that allows for smooth dynamic transitions from a piano to a very strong one, with a very subtle change. It offers simulations on the strings of an acoustic piano, and simulation on the soundboard. All this adds up to a great experience that emulates the feeling of a real acoustic piano very well.

It is very important to recognize that both the Px-870 and the PX770 offer these features, and the differences between them we saw earlier. And now a video of the Casio PX-770 Privia:

If you want to know more about this model, don’t miss our review of the Casio PX-770 Privia.

Casio PX-870 Privia vs Yamaha YDP-144 Arius

Now we will buy the digital pianos: the Casio PX-870 Privia which as we already know is priced at €799/$999/£735 and the Yamaha YDP-144 Arius which is priced at €845/£774 With such a small price difference it will be excellent to analyze each of the features offered by both pianos. Let’s move on to the face-to-face:

  • Both pianos have 88 weighted keys with ebony and synthetic ivory simulation. The Casio with its Scaled Hammer Action II technology, and the Yamaha with its GHS technology. Remember that the counterweight is the weight of the keys to simulate those of an acoustic piano. The bass keys weigh more while some keys weigh less.
  • Both have sensitivity in their keys. Casio has three levels of sensitivity, while Yamaha has four levels of sensitivity. This means that the Yamaha can be more dynamic in its performances (it depends a lot on the hand of the pianist). Sensitivity means that when we play a stronger key it sounds higher, and when we play a less strong key it sounds lower.
  • The Casio offers 19 sounds with 256 notes of polyphony, generated by its AiR sound engine. The Yamaha offers 10 sounds with 192 notes of polyphony, generated by its Yamaha CFX engine.
  • The Casio has split, dual, duo functions and has DSP (Digital Signal Process) effects such as: Chorus, Reverb and Brillance. In addition to Mute Resonance, Hammer Response, Mute Noise, functions that allow you to optimize the simulation of a real acoustic piano. The Yamaha has Dual, Split and Duo functions, as well as Reverb, Damping Resonance and Acoustic and Stereo Optimizers.
  • Both have a triple footswitch that is ideal for the conservatory studio, have a MIDI recording function, and only the Casio PX-870 has audio recording in WAV format.
  • Both have a USB-to-host connection, allowing them to be connected to a computer for use as a MIDI controller in a music composition or production program. However, only the Casio PX-870 has a USB-to-host connection for connecting flash drives.
  • In terms of speakers, the Casio has two 20W speakers, when the Yamaha has two 8W speakers.
  • In weight and dimensions, the Casio weighs 35.5 kg and its dimensions are 1367 × 299 × 837 mm (H x W x D). The Yamaha weighs 38 kg and measures 1357 x 815 x 422 mm (H x W x D). Remember that both pianos have furniture included, so their weight is relatively portable.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Casio PX-870 Privia

Yamaha YDP-144 Arius

  • 88 weighted keys with Scaled Hammer Action II (Tri-Sensor) technology that emulates synthetic ebony/ivory touch
  • 19 sounds
  • Extra Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR chip
  • Volume Sync EQ’ and ‘Headphone’ modes for regulating bass and treble for pianists who want to play quite loud
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • Dual function
  • Split function
  • DSP effects, chorus and ‘Brilliance’ effect
  • Extra concert performance effects and hammer response to enhance the acoustic piano feeling
  • Resonance dampening effect
  • Recording function
  • 60 songs
  • Transposition
  • Metronome
  • Duo mode
  • 2 hull exits
  • Cover that imitates an acoustic piano
  • Triple pedalboard
  • USB to Host
  • USB to device for connecting flash drives
  • Very powerful 20W speakers
  • Weight 35.5 kg and dimensions with stand 1367 x 299 x 837mm (H x W x D)
  • Weight: 35,5kg
  • It has a lectern
  • Includes power supply
  • 88″ GHS keyboard
  • Yamaha CFX piano sound
  • Intelligent Acoustic Control
  • Acoustic Optimizer
  • Stereophonic Optimizer
  • 192 notes of polyphony
  • 10 sounds
  • Reverb and damping resonance
  • Duo mode
  • Key-Off Samples
  • 2 track recording (1 song)
  • 3 pedals
  • 10 sound demos and 50 pre-set songs
  • Keyboard cover
  • USB to host connection
  • 2 headphone jacks
  • Speaker system: 2 x 8W
  • Dimensions of 1357 x 815 x 422 mm
  • A very suitable weight 38 Kg

As you can see in the table, they are somewhat similar digital pianos, a valuable difference being that the Casio has 19 sounds with 256 notes of polyphony, and the Yamaha has 10 with 192 notes of polyphony.

I really don’t know why the Casio PX 870 doesn’t sell more than the Yamaha P144 which beats it in sales popularity. But it’s a really good option to take into account.

First a video of Yamaha’s GHS technology, where the functions of a real acoustic piano are explained and how they are simulated. It also explains that each note is weighted according to its dynamic range, just like an acoustic piano.

And now a video of the Yamaha YDP-144 Arius

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Yamaha YDP-144 Arius.

Casio PX-870 Privia vs Thomann DP-26

Now we will buy these two digital pianos: the Casio PX-870 with a price of €799/$999/£735 and the Thomann DP-26 with a price of €311/£279 having a big difference, so much so that for the price of one you can buy a pair of the other. Let’s look at their differences and similarities head-to-head:

  • Both digital pianos have 88 weighted, touch-sensitive keys. That in the Casio has Scaled Hammer Action II technology, which emulates the feel of synthetic ebony and ivory.
  • The Casio offers 19 sounds with 256 notes of polyphony, while the Thomann gives us 20 sounds with 64 notes of polyphony, with a disadvantage in polyphony.
  • Both digital pianos have dual and split functions, plus Reverb and Chorus effects.
  • An important issue, the Casio PX-870 has a triple pedalboard integrated, when the Thomann DP26 has input for a Sustain pedal with the included pedal.
  • The Thomann has a pitch bend wheel, which serves to change the height of a note while playing.
  • Both have a USB to host connection, which allows them to be connected to a computer for use as a MIDI controller in a music composition or production program. However, only the Casio PX-870 has a USB-to-host connection for connecting flash drives.
  • In terms of speakers, the Casio has two 20W speakers, when the Thomann has two 10W speakers.
  • In weight and dimensions, the Casio weighs 35.5 kg and its dimensions are 1367 × 299 × 837 mm (H x W x D). The Thomann weighs 13 kg and measures 1365 x 366 x 137 mm (H x W x D). Remember that both the Casio has furniture included. That’s why there is a big difference between the weights.

Although the Thomann is a good option to start playing the piano in a decent way, as we can see by its price and its different functions the Casio is at a much higher level.
We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Casio PX-870 Privia

Thomann DP-26

  • 88 weighted keys with Scaled Hammer Action II (Tri-Sensor) technology that emulates synthetic ebony/ivory touch
  • 19 sounds
  • Extra Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR chip
  • Volume Sync EQ’ and ‘Headphone’ modes for regulating bass and treble for pianists who want to play quite loud
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • Dual function
  • Split function
  • DSP effects, chorus and ‘Brilliance’ effect
  • Extra concert performance effects and hammer response to enhance the acoustic piano feeling
  • Resonance dampening effect
  • Recording function
  • 60 songs
  • Transposition
  • Metronome
  • Duo mode
  • 2 hull exits
  • Cover that imitates an acoustic piano
  • Triple pedalboard
  • USB to Host
  • USB to device for connecting flash drives
  • Very powerful 20W speakers
  • Weight 35.5 kg and dimensions with stand 1367 x 299 x 837mm (H x W x D)
  • Weight: 35,5kg
  • It has a lectern
  • Includes power supply
  • 88 hammer-type touch-sensitive weighted keys
  • 20 sounds
  • 2 demo songs
  • 64 notes of polyphony
  • Display screen
  • Dual mode or layer
  • Split mode
  • 50 styles
  • Master EQ
  • Reverb Effect
  • Chorus Effect
  • Sequencer with 5 user songs
  • Duo mode
  • 60 preset songs
  • Pitch Bend
  • Metronome
  • Transposition Functionality
  • 2 powerful 10W speakers
  • 2 hull exits
  • USB MIDI
  • Conventional MIDI output
  • Sustain pedal input including pedal
  • Includes music stand and power supply
  • Weight 13 kg and dimensions 1365 x 366 x 137mm

And now a video of the Thomann DP-26

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Thomann DP-26.

Casio PX-870 Privia vs Yamaha YDP 164

Finally, we will have the comparison of the following digital pianos: the Casio PX 870 with a price of €799/$999/£735 and the Yamaha YDP 164 with a price of €990/£899, with a difference of about £200 we will see their differences and similarities on the next face:

  • Both pianos have 88 weighted keys with ebony and synthetic ivory simulation. The Casio with the Scaled Hammer Action II technology, and the Yamaha with its GHS 3 technology. Let’s remember that the counterweight, is the weight that the keys have to simulate those of an acoustic piano. The bass keys weigh more while some keys weigh less. The Yamaha YDP 164 improves on the Yamaha YDP 144 in counterbalance quality as it is GH3 instead of GHS.
  • Both have sensitivity on their keys. The Casio has three levels of sensitivity, while the Yamaha has four levels of sensitivity. This means that the Yamaha can be more dynamic in its performances (it depends a lot on the hand of the pianist). Sensitivity means that when we play a stronger key it sounds higher, and when we play a less strong key it sounds lower.
  • The Casio offers 19 sounds with 256 notes of polyphony, generated by its AiR sound engine. The Yamaha offers 10 sounds with 192 notes of polyphony, generated by its Yamaha CFX sound engine.
  • The Casio has split, dual, and duo functions and has DSP (Digital Signal Process) effects such as: Chorus, Reverb, and Brillance. In addition to Mute Resonance, Hammer Response, Mute Noise, functions that allow you to optimize the simulation of a real acoustic piano. The Yamaha has Dual, Split and Duo functions, as well as Reverb, Damping Resonance and Acoustic and Stereo Optimizers.
  • Both have a triple footswitch ideal for the conservatory studio, have MIDI recording function, and only the Casio PX-870 has audio recording in WAV format.
  • Both have a USB-to-host connection, which allows them to be connected to a computer for use as a MIDI controller in a music composition or production program. However, only the Casio PX-870 has a USB-to-host connection for connecting flash drives.
  • Both pianos have two 20 W speakers.
  • In weight and dimensions, the Casio weighs 35.5 kg and measures 1367 × 299 × 837 mm (H x W x D). The Yamaha weighs 42 kg and measures 1357 x 815 x 422 mm (H x W x D). Remember that both pianos have furniture included, so they are more or less portable by car.

We will put the characteristics of each of these pianos in 2 different columns to make it easier to see the differences:

Casio PX-870 Privia

Yamaha YDP 164

  • 88 weighted keys with Scaled Hammer Action II (Tri-Sensor) technology that emulates synthetic ebony/ivory touch
  • 19 sounds
  • Extra Multi-Dimensional Morphing AiR chip
  • Volume Sync EQ’ and ‘Headphone’ modes for regulating bass and treble for pianists who want to play quite loud
  • 256 notes of polyphony
  • Dual function
  • Split function
  • DSP effects, chorus and ‘Brilliance’ effect
  • Extra concert performance effects and hammer response to enhance the acoustic piano feeling
  • Resonance dampening effect
  • Recording function
  • 60 songs
  • Transposition
  • Metronome
  • Duo mode
  • 2 hull exits
  • Cover that imitates an acoustic piano
  • Triple pedalboard
  • USB to Host
  • USB to device for connecting flash drives
  • Very powerful 20W speakers
  • Weight 35.5 kg and dimensions with stand 1367 x 299 x 837mm (H x W x D)
  • Weight: 35,5kg
  • It has a lectern
  • Includes power supply
  • 88 Graded Hammer 3 (GH3) action notes with synthetic ivory and ebony key tops
  • Yamaha CFX piano sound
  • Intelligent Acoustic Control
  • Acoustic Optimizer
  • Stereophonic Optimizer
  • 192 notes of polyphony
  • 10 sounds
  • 4 types of reverb
  • Dual function and duo mode
  • Metronome
  • 2 track recorder (1 song)
  • 10 demo songs and 50 piano songs
  • 3 pedals
  • Keyboard cover
  • USB to host connection
  • 2 headphone jacks
  • 2 x 20W speaker system
  • Dimensions: 1357 x 849 x 422 mm
  • Weight: 42 Kg
  • Color: Black

Let’s first look at Yamaha’s GH3 technology, which uses a springless hammer system, a heavier touch in the low range and a lighter touch in the high range. Each key has three sensors, which together with synthetic ebony and ivory simulate the playing of a real acoustic piano.

Here is a video of the Yamaha

If you want to know more about this model don’t miss our review of the Yamaha YDP 164.

Where to buy Casio PX 870

 

Amazon

  • Free Shipping and possibility of shipping in one day with Amazon Premium.
  • Full Guarantee but they are no experts in music equipment.
  • Sometimes better price.
  • He’s got worse stock than Thomann.

Thomann

  • Free Shipping.
  • Full warranty. If you have any problems, they take care of everything.
  • 100% reliable payment.
  • Leader in trouble-free shipping.
  • Usually Best price.
  • Best Reputation: They are the leading online store in Europe and have the best catalogue and information.

Check below related models with similar price and features:

Jaime Echagüe

Hi! I'm Jaime Echagüe, a musician and an authentic fan of musical instruments. With this blog I want to give general information about musical instruments in an easy, direct and honest way. I hope you enjoy my website and that you find it very useful.

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